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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi All,

I don't have but a rare opportunity to contribute, and not sure I can do a good job with this one, but I will try.

One of the previous owners of Money-Pit (the name I gave to my Sky) was creative with interior lighting. When opening the driver door (unfortunately, not also the passenger door) the floor lit up a deep blue glow from 2 blue LEDs per side. I bought a 20-pack of 12V daylight LEDs to replace the 3 burnt-out bulbs in the 3-dial climate control and to replace the deep blue floor lights with more practical lighting. The extra lighting was also controlled with a mechanical switch that had been located above the driver's right foot, out of sight.

The custom made wire harness needed to be replaced because of an intermittent connection inside it somewhere, so I duplicated it with a clean, more carefully made version shown here. Just FYI, the box up top mimics a car battery.
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The lighting circuit requires 3 connections to the vehicle. The first red power (fuse-protected) wire taps into a wire in the vehicle harness under the steering wheel, the second gray wire taps into a wire near the fuse panel on the passenger floor, and the third is a black ground connection to the chassis. In the picture above, my bench test did not utilize the gray wire. The circuit involves a relay of which I am not sure why it is needed. Because it works, I wasn't going to change it, but the more complex wiring is not easy to share with others. But still I thought it is worth sharing my pictures to promote creativity for other Sky owners.

Here is each lighting circuit. I later added a strain relief using a wire tie, then an insulation pad to make them semi-sealed.
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I will be relocating the control switch just to the right of the airbag indicator for easy access for both occupants,. I don't have the traction control button in that trim plate which offers a very large area to accommodate the light switch. The original switch happens to be aesthetically appealing with consideration to the interior design.

This is one LED light fixture installed on the passenger under-belly panel.
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Here is a pic of the light on my work bench held roughly at the same height it would be inside the car.
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This is the relay.
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This is the switch that will be mounted on the center console to the right of the air bag indicator.
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Thanks for sharing this.

I am working from memory, and that is dangerous, but I believe that the grey wire is the normal control wire for the interior lights. It is a PWM signal that provides the theater dimming function. I can confirm tonight, and direct you toward how to connect the lights to work when the doors open, and to provide the manual override with your switch, or you can probably do a little searching to find the threads that have been posted about similar installations.

Connecting LEDs to the stock circuit will usually result in a slight glow when they are supposed to be off, especially if the incandescent bulbs in the mirror are replaced with LEDs also. This is due to the leakage current of the transistor that controls the lights, and it is always present but insufficient to light the standard bulbs so you just can't see it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Hi John,

I surely wasn't expecting any kind of help, but I surely appreciate what you dig up.

The circuit seems to work perfectly with exception to the passenger door not activating it as I would have expected. But with Money-Pit, I can't rule out that something is uniquely wrong with the car because nearly everything I touch on Money-Pit has needed special care. I do have to say that the mirror lights come on as they should when opening the passenger door which leads me to believe the gray control wire should tapped to another wire.
 

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If both doors activate the mirror lights, that circuit at least seems to be OK. This one, at least, should be faily easy and won't dig your pit any deeper.
I'll post what I find, unless someone else posts it first.
 

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John is correct - here's a link to a post he made where to find the wire (from 12 years ago!): Foot Well Lighting

Remember, this wire is a "fading" ground wire, so goes to the negative side of your LEDs. The +ve side of the LEDs should be connected to an "always-ON" 12V supply in the fuse box. Hoosier suggests a location in the first post of that same thread.

You should remove the relay from your wiring, otherwise you'll get nasty chattering when the lights are fading out.
 

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John is correct - here's a link to a post he made where to find the wire (from 12 years ago!): Foot Well Lighting

Remember, this wire is a "fading" ground wire, so goes to the negative side of your LEDs. The +ve side of the LEDs should be connected to an "always-ON" 12V supply in the fuse box. Hoosier suggests a location in the first post of that same thread.

You should remove the relay from your wiring, otherwise you'll get nasty chattering when the lights are fading out.
Its unfortunate that those photobucket images are no longer available...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
John,

This forum and especially you, have been so very helpful in transforming Money-Pit back to its former glory. Thank you again.

This forum has also connected me to someone parting out a Sky, making it financially feasible to swap out cosmetically deficient parts. I don't know his forum name, but "Thank you Matthew".

I hope one day I can give Money-Pit a complimentary name.....after a successful transformation from a slave girl to "Princess Cinderella"......yes, I have two little, extremely cute, and Grandpa-loving grand daughters. Maybe when I'm done I'll call it Cinderella, ha, ha.

Thanks to you too TomatoSoup.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You should remove the relay from your wiring, otherwise you'll get nasty chattering when the lights are fading out.
I wonder if keeping the relay is a good idea because in my case, I have an additional control switch to turn on the floor lighting on-demand. That is the reason why I kept it.
 

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I installed foot well lighting on my Solstice some years ago and the pictures are still on the thread as I uploaded them to the site at the time. The lights on both footwells come on with the lights on the mirror. I hope the moderators don't mind me posting this link but I think it'll help you find the proper wires.

 

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I wonder if keeping the relay is a good idea because in my case, I have an additional control switch to turn on the floor lighting on-demand. That is the reason why I kept it.
You don't need the relay. Wiring the switch in parallel with the BCM will let you turn all of the lights on with the switch. If you want to be able to operate the footwell lights without turning on the map lights you may have to change the switch because you will need a SPDT contact to switch the LEDs between the BCM control and a solid ground. You could use the relay for that if it has the right contacts, but I would still eliminate it to keep things simple.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
OP here,

A number of people here are replying who have installed foot well lighting. Thank you all for your input and experiences.

I have some questions for you......

How do you control your foot well lighting?
Only when opening the doors?
When turning on an over-head mirror light?
Are you able to turn on your foot well lights while driving?

The extra wire harness that supports my foot well lighting has an additional switch (with a relay) to turn on the floor lights when the doors are closed, for example when driving. I think that extra feature is unique. I am not sure I should hook up power and control to the same places as you.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
To be honest, I am a bit confused.

What is SPDT?

A schematic and pictures showing colors and locations of wires would make it very clear.

I had hoped to get my wire harness made and ready for installation when installing the interior. I still have so many parts spewed about my rec room.
 

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To be honest, I am a bit confused.

What is SPDT?

A schematic and pictures showing colors and locations of wires would make it very clear.

I had hoped to get my wire harness made and ready for installation when installing the interior. I still have so many parts spewed about my rec room.
Sorry about that. SPDT is shorthand for Single Pole Double Throw, and describes the way the switch or relay works.

SPST is Single Pole Single Throw which functions as a simple On or Off. If your switch has two terminals, it is SPST
SPDT is Single Pole Double Throw which is a selector. Your relay for example is SPDT where terminal 30 connects to either terminal 87 or 87a depending on whether it is energized or not.
The functionality extends to DPxT, 3PxT and so on if your device has multiple independent circuits doing the same thing.
Not that it matters here, but Double Throw switches can also be 2-position or 3-position where the central position of the 3-position usually offers an "all off" setting.

Here is a very crude sketch of the circuit that I mentioned. It is more descriptive than detailed, and omitted any fuses. Don't omit the fuses!
Capture.PNG
As TomatoSoup mentioned, the LEDs are connected to a constant hot +12V, and automatic control is on the (-) or 0V side through the BCM. This circuit gives you manual control of your LEDs by connecting the (-) side directly to ground instead of to the BCM. The control can either be your relay, with terminal 30 connected to the LEDs, 87 to the BCM, and 87a to ground, or it can be a SPDT switch wired directly.

Pictures will have to wait until I am with my car, and have some time.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
JohnWR,

So instead of what I have today with a simple on/off switch working with a relay, I replace them with a 3-pole switch that the two switch positions work this way.

position a: on to work when either door is open
position b: on demand (for example while driving).

Did I understand your schematic correctly?
 

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JohnWR,

So instead of what I have today with a simple on/off switch working with a relay, I replace them with a 3-pole switch that the two switch positions work this way.

position a: on to work when either door is open
position b: on demand (for example while driving).

Did I understand your schematic correctly?
Yes, that is the way that I would do it, to remove the complexity and potential failure of the relay.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
JohnWR,

I "love" simplicity so I will follow your lead on this.

I really like the size and style of the on/off switch I had already so I searched out an on/on switch of the same. I found it at Homemade Electronics. The switch is a Philmore 30-16210 sold for $1.79 but I had to buy 6 switches to meet the $10 minimum purchase. Shipping was $4.65. I may use the other 5 switches in my motor home so it was money well spent.
 
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