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I’m finding the auto driving technology both exciting and intimidating at the same time. Getting older, I’m hoping it will be an aid to older drivers being able to “drive” and keep their independence and mobility. Not there yet, but time seems to fly as one gets older!
Currently we have a 2021 Crosstrek with Eyesight and automatic lane centering, it’s technology is vastly ahead of our 2019 Crosstrek with older tech.
Thanks for sharing what’s on the horizon.
 

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My uncle who has worked as a computer engineer for decades claimed multiple times cars would never self drive...

I know we're not there yet, but we're closer than he realizes.
 

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George Jetson and the engineers over at Spacely Sprockets
said that we'd all be driving around in flying cars by now. So?
 

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George Jetson and the engineers over at Spacely Sprockets
said that we'd all be driving around in flying cars by now. So?
Good point, and even in the three-dimensional world there have been lots of future-tech predictions that haven't been exactly accurate.

Of course those predictions were for technology that didn't actually exist yet being in use decades in the future, and in this case they are talking about next year and technology that is being demonstrated today.
 

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There are a lot of issues that need to be addressed before truely autonomous vehicles are on public roads.
None the least of which is the ethical questions. These play into how liability is determined and will impact the cost of ownership of cars with autonomy. Or why is my car deciding to kill ME!

The Ethics of Self-Driving Cars - Viterbi Conversations in Ethics (usc.edu)

Self-driving cars process huge amounts of sensory information in a very short amount of time. The processing speed of this information allows self-driving cars to make an informed decision on how to act in the case of an accident. In scenarios where casualties are unavoidable, this produces an ethical dilemma in determining who should survive, raising questions about how the value of a life should be calculated. Ultimately, because all lives are equal and no individual should have power over deciding the fate of the lives of others, self-driving cars are unethical.
 

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An obvious step in self driving cars is to link them together to share data on hazards and road conditions outside the range of on board sensors. This then brings with it a plethora of issues like do I want the "system" to know where I am all the time and make automated decisions that can impact my safety and health? I think in my case, NOT.

What happens when the network goes down?

What happens when your system is hacked? Can I steal your car remotely from say the Ukrane and deliver it to a chop shop to collect my bitcoiins?
 

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The question of full autonomy goes back to 2014. There was a time when leaders across industry focused on the disruptive potential of autonomous vehicles. Here in 2021, those disruptive scenarios have not emerged on the timeline many expected. So, how close are we really to level five autonomous driving? That quote above provides one man’s opinion. Granted, that opinion comes from Elon Musk, a person that has made technology history for decades. As this article via Nick Hobson describes, vehicles that have achieved level five autonomy can drive in all circumstances, removing the need for a steering wheel and driver’s seat. Many experts believe reaching level five autonomy is next to impossible. Those beliefs stem from the complexity of the human mind, and the intuition we use in decision making.


Algorithms lack this intuition. They must be trained on every possible situation encountered while driving. The human brain on the other hand is remarkable in its adaptiveness. The article points to the work of Daniel Kahneman, a Nobel prize winner in economics for his work on human judgment and decision-making. He identified three ways that humans develop their intuition: we create predictable situations, we practice, and we get feedback.
 

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I dont want an autonomous vehicle. I enjoy the process of driving and the sense of freedom that results. I dont want the car to turn into another appliance. I believe that there are going to be a lot of unintended consequences of adopting level 5 autonomy that will fundimentally change the entire industry. Once every car maker can deliver level 5 autonmy, why would anyone pay extra for a mercedes when you can have a local shop buy off the shelf components and 3d print you a box that will take you from point A to point B for a lot less cost. Why even own a car? Just have transportation appliances available on call and summon a trip when ever and where ever? I dont think the car makers are ready for the negative impacts that achieving levbel 5 autonomy will bring.

I think that some added technology is great. Colision avoidance, lane warnings, etc that are single vehicle centric are all good in my opinion.
Its going to be a lot cheaper to build other forms of transport that support the need for automated transportation rather than upgrading our entire infrastructure. Every road, every parking lot, everywhere.
 

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What if the new NCC-1701 Saturn Sky can zip you to another location instead of a different time when you hit 88 mph like back to the future. "Saturn: Beam me up there!" Or maybe "Warp me there!"
 
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