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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am curious about the break in for these babies. I have been told that today's cars don't need to be broken in like the older cars because this is done at the factory. I have been hearing different people saying they are cautious during the break in. First, what is the brake in period (miles), and second, what are the rules for the break in? Also, I see some of you are changing your oil within the first 500-1000 miles. I didn't think you needed to do this as often because of the Mobil 1 synthetic oil. I want to do it right and there are conflicting opinions. :confused:
 

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Change your oil at 500 miles...

During the break-in period there is one IMPORTANT aspect that changing the oil early addresses – lose metal. In the simplest terms the following is the answer to your question: Because it is good for your engine. The following addresses the next level of detail

Oil in an engine allows two parts to come into close contact with each other and move as designed, but not wear each other out. Some would also add that the oil helps form a moveable seal between the parts when needed.

In a new engine you have many parts that are coming into contact with each other for the first time and much like dating, they need to know how to get along with each other. This was REAL important in engines in the past when manufacturing tolerances of parts were not as good as they are today. Some even argue that given the tolerance achieved today negate the need for break-in, but as those “purists” know at some level there are imperfections that will affect the part they are rubbing up against. The following is occurring during the break-in period at the micro level: One part with an imperfection, let’s say a high point, is rubbing against another part. After a period of time one of two things will happen, either the high point will break off or a grove will be worn into the other part. It is those broken off high points that you need to worry about.

Lose metal roaming around in your new engine is a bad thing. If it becomes lodged between two other parts, you have a new problem. Think of it as sanding the inside of your engine. If you REALLY want to destroy an engine then introduce some metal shavings into the oil and over time you will have problems.

As you can see the type of oil doesn’t matter much when addressing this issue – oil is the just the vehicle used to carry those metal shavings to the bottom of you oil pan.

So the thought is that you have to allow the engine some time to wear down or break off those high points, yet not enough time to redistribute them throughout the engine. You style of driving (i.e., how hard you push the engine) will determine how long the break-in period should be. There are other threads addressing this issue and rather than hyper link them for you, I would recommend you find them yourself and maybe pick up some other info along the way.

There are other issues that come up during the break-in period, but this one alone should help you decide when to change the oil. Our Sky is a redline and we have not reached the 500 mi mark yet, but at that point I play to have the oil changed.

Good luck, r1chy
 

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According to the Owners Manual for my base Sky:

Brakes: Avoid hard stops for the first 200 miles, and for 200 miles after every brake pad replacement, to break in the brake linings.

Engine, axle, "other parts": For the first 500 miles: Do not drive for long periods at one speed. Do not exceed 70 MPH. Do not operate at full throttle. Do not downshift to slow down.

Oil Change: The Oil Life System will tell you when to change the oil, based on driving patterns, etc. It may be as often as 3000 miles, it may be much longer. It is recommended that you change it at least once a year. There is no recommendation that I have found for an early first oil change. Also, my Owners Manual does not indicate that the oil is synthetic, but that may be different for the RL due to more extreme oil demands by the turbo.

Many people will say that the Oil Life System is crap, and they may be right. I am following it.
 

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Thanks

Thanks for the info - I didn't know any of this stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #5
According to the Owners Manual for my base Sky:

Brakes: Avoid hard stops for the first 200 miles, and for 200 miles after every brake pad replacement, to break in the brake linings.

Engine, axle, "other parts": For the first 500 miles: Do not drive for long periods at one speed. Do not exceed 70 MPH. Do not operate at full throttle. Do not downshift to slow down.

Oil Change: The Oil Life System will tell you when to change the oil, based on driving patterns, etc. It may be as often as 3000 miles, it may be much longer. It is recommended that you change it at least once a year. There is no recommendation that I have found for an early first oil change. Also, my Owners Manual does not indicate that the oil is synthetic, but that may be different for the RL due to more extreme oil demands by the turbo.

Many people will say that the Oil Life System is crap, and they may be right. I am following it.
Thank you both for your input. I will take this information to heart so my baby will not burp and spit up! There are so many opinions, but I would rather err on the side of caution than throw fate to the wind. I expect to get many pleasurable miles from my Sky RL. :driving: Thanks to those on this forum like you for taking your time to educate me and others. This information is invaluable!!! :thumbs:
 

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Owners manual is a great source for this kind of info.
Do what I did -- sit in the car get a beverage (use the flimsy cup holder) and read it cover to cover. Then go back and hit the things that caught your eye the first time through. It really does answer 90% of the questions. And being in the car you can redially try things (like programming the DIC) :thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Owners manual is a great source for this kind of info.
Do what I did -- sit in the car get a beverage (use the flimsy cup holder) and read it cover to cover. Then go back and hit the things that caught your eye the first time through. It really does answer 90% of the questions. And being in the car you can redially try things (like programming the DIC) :thumbs:
Boy, after xx years of driving and quite a few new cars, I finally find a use for this Owner's Manual. Never spent that kind of time reading those...step on the gas and go...then stop! But this is a different ball game. I love you guys for sharing! You're the best!!! :grouphug:
 

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Boy, after xx years of driving and quite a few new cars, I finally find a use for this Owner's Manual. Never spent that kind of time reading those...step on the gas and go...then stop! But this is a different ball game. I love you guys for sharing! You're the best!!! :grouphug:
:D If you are like me -- all my other cars were so, well, vanilla - that there was little difference from one to the next... The SKY has it's differences!:thumbs:
 

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According to the Owners Manual for my base Sky:

Brakes: Avoid hard stops for the first 200 miles, and for 200 miles after every brake pad replacement, to break in the brake linings.
I always found this strange. The first thing you do with any quasi-performance brake pad is to bed in the pads. How do you do this? You do several hard stops from 30-60-100 (100 can be skipped if you don't have access to a closed road) then let them fully cool. This probably does the same thing as letting them wear naturally for 200 miles as you want to marry the rotors with the pad material.
 

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Our procedure for bedding brakes was to do several very controlled slow-downs from moderate speeds, letting everything cool very well in between, usually by idling around the track for a lap or two and not using the brakes at all. The cooling seemed to be very critical to make the brakes more fade resistant. The idea was to cook the solvents out of the pad material slowly, before getting them too hot. Too much heat too soon tended to glaze the pad surface.
 

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Only thing I did was wait about two weeks before going over 80MPH. Have never read the manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Our procedure for bedding brakes was to do several very controlled slow-downs from moderate speeds, letting everything cool very well in between, usually by idling around the track for a lap or two and not using the brakes at all. The cooling seemed to be very critical to make the brakes more fade resistant. The idea was to cook the solvents out of the pad material slowly, before getting them too hot. Too much heat too soon tended to glaze the pad surface.
You guys are the best! Thanks for all this information. I've never heard of bedding brakes before. I want to break in this baby the right way. :yesnod: :driving:
 

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Just to keep everything in perspective: The brake bedding procedure I mentioned was used for racing brake pads. I would never suggest that it be followed for street pads, just follow the Owners Manual recommendation. There was even a lot of controversy about the best way to bed racing pads, and I'm not really sure it makes a huge difference how you do it.
 

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I'd recommend changing the oil after 1500 miles and resetting the "change oil" counter. Avoid WOT (Wide-Open-Throttle) for the first 500 miles, as well as avoiding constant, steady speeds and harsh stops (for the brake-pads). If you lightly rev your car (in gear, while driving, ie. go from 50mph to 60mph) for the first few hundred miles and use recommended octane or slightly better (ie. 1 or 2 points over) your car should have it's pistons set nicely and you could achieve greater than posted MPG. Avoid speeds over 75mph for the first 500 miles and RPMS over 4000 rpms.

Metal filings will undoubtedly be prevalent as the engine "breaks in" so an early-than-normal oil change would be prudent.

Since the RedLine does not have a turbo-timer (which is a handy gadget that allows the engine to idle after exitting to continue to run the turbo charger so it cools off) you absolutley MUST warm-up the car for at least 1 minute before taking-off, and for the love of all that is HOLY let the car idle for at least 2 minutes or even up to FIVE MINUTES to let the turbo cool down from the exhaust gas heat so that you don't cook the oil and destroy the turbo's bearings!!! If you just jump out of your car or turn off the engine upon arrival of your destination your turbo will last no longer than a year or two at be$t. But I'm sure you all know this.

Finally, the rear-differential fluid will probably need to be changed no later than 7000 miles as GM is notorious for issues with metal filings crunching-up the transmition. Should cost no more than $70. Make sure they remove the rear-differential cover and wipe down the inside and magnet and drain-plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'd recommend changing the oil after 1500 miles and resetting the "change oil" counter. Avoid WOT (Wide-Open-Throttle) for the first 500 miles, as well as avoiding constant, steady speeds and harsh stops (for the brake-pads). If you lightly rev your car (in gear, while driving, ie. go from 50mph to 60mph) for the first few hundred miles and use recommended octane or slightly better (ie. 1 or 2 points over) your car should have it's pistons set nicely and you could achieve greater than posted MPG. Avoid speeds over 75mph for the first 500 miles and RPMS over 4000 rpms.

Metal filings will undoubtedly be prevalent as the engine "breaks in" so an early-than-normal oil change would be prudent.

Since the RedLine does not have a turbo-timer (which is a handy gadget that allows the engine to idle after exitting to continue to run the turbo charger so it cools off) you absolutley MUST warm-up the car for at least 1 minute before taking-off, and for the love of all that is HOLY let the car idle for at least 2 minutes or even up to FIVE MINUTES to let the turbo cool down from the exhaust gas heat so that you don't cook the oil and destroy the turbo's bearings!!! If you just jump out of your car or turn off the engine upon arrival of your destination your turbo will last no longer than a year or two at be$t. But I'm sure you all know this.

Finally, the rear-differential fluid will probably need to be changed no later than 7000 miles as GM is notorious for issues with metal filings crunching-up the transmition. Should cost no more than $70. Make sure they remove the rear-differential cover and wipe down the inside and magnet and drain-plug.
I can't believe all the information I am receiving on this site. Thanks so much for sharing your knowledge. I am printing all this out and making a folder so I won't have to hunt for the good stuff when my baby is delivered. That way I can digest it and be ready! Thanks again!!!!! :thumbs:
 

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Um im not sure but i think the turbo has an oil reservior and does not need to idle..and the manual for the gxp doesnt seem to say anything about letting the car run.
 

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Um im not sure but i think the turbo has an oil reservior and does not need to idle..and the manual for the gxp doesnt seem to say anything about letting the car run.
Reservior or not, a turbo is exhaust driven, causing it to literally get RED hot during use... if any oil is let to sit in a RED HOT turbo, it will boil and gunk up the turbo. Running the car and moving oil through the turbo until it cools to a reasonable temp. is necessary on all turbo'd cars without a timer
 
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