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One question I forgot to ask, does anyone torque their lug nuts, or do you just crank them down really tight with a lug wrench??
I torque to 100 ft/lbs, take a spin around the block and recheck torque. Every now and then I find one that will take a second tightening after a drive. And when I autocross, I will check them when I arrive and check them again after each session. Rarely do they loosen up but every now and then you find one 5lbs or so looser.
 

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Say what u want....I have never torqued lug nuts on the Sky or any other car...there has never been an issue....that I know of....
The same here with me. I use a long handled 1/2" pivot-head ratchet and deep socket and never had a problem on any vehicle. In the mid-west area I live, winter does a number on lugs and stems such that using a torque wrench will under-torque due to the extra resistance from corrosion.
 

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Say what u want....I have never torqued lug nuts on the Sky or any other car...there has never been an issue....that I know of....
Maybe it is my racing background, but I always torque any lug nut on any car. I'll give you a couple of reasons why.

1 - As I was warming up my car to head for pregrid at the run-offs, I watched my opposition using a breaker bar with a socket to tighten his wheel nuts instead of a torque wrench. I actually heard one of the studs break - which made my race a lot ore sedate as he was the only one who was near me on points. I expect the adrenalin rush of being late for pregrid added a few foot-lbs to his pull.....

2 - a recurring problem on another car I own is that people frequently strip the nuts when they don't use a torque wrench. The nuts are aluminum, not steel and can't be torqued beyond 55-60 lbs.

All of that is why any competent shop would fire a mechanic who tightened wheel nuts with an air gun, unless he used a torque stick between the socket and gun - that's a special extension that gives at a certain torque and won't tighten any further. And I always insist that they actually use a torque wrench on any of my cars I have in a shop.

If I were out on the road and had a flat in a car that happened to have a spare, then sure I would change a wheel without a torque wrench, and I'd tighten in judiciously, but would always use a torque wrench otherwise. Ah - I forgot - no one changes a flat on the road these days - they just get out their cell phone and calls up someone to do it for them....
 

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All of that is why any competent shop would fire a mechanic who tightened wheel nuts with an air gun, unless he used a torque stick between the socket and gun - that's a special extension that gives at a certain torque and won't tighten any further. And I always insist that they actually use a torque wrench on any of my cars I have in a shop.
I had a shop change out my wheels. Expressly told them not to run the lugs in with an impact wrench and they did it anyway. 2 studs on 2 wheels (four studs total) were damaged to the point that when I went to remove them the following weekend to put my autocross tires on, I broke two and stopped trying to take the other two out when I could tell they were going to snap as well if I kept trying to loosen them.

They then replaced them with shorter studs because they didn't want to get the GM studs with the "D" shaped back plate necessary to clear the hubs at their length. With the tire on, the nuts went on about a turn and a half before tightening down! I ordered 4 new studs from GM and watched them remove the short studs, install the GM studs, and reinstall the wheel with a torque wrench, then never went back.

100 ft/lbs, every time, anda recheck after a drive. No issues.
 

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Maybe it is my racing background, but I always torque any lug nut on any car. I'll give you a couple of reasons why.

1 - As I was warming up my car to head for pregrid at the run-offs, I watched my opposition using a breaker bar with a socket to tighten his wheel nuts instead of a torque wrench. I actually heard one of the studs break - which made my race a lot ore sedate as he was the only one who was near me on points. I expect the adrenalin rush of being late for pregrid added a few foot-lbs to his pull.....

2 - a recurring problem on another car I own is that people frequently strip the nuts when they don't use a torque wrench. The nuts are aluminum, not steel and can't be torqued beyond 55-60 lbs.

All of that is why any competent shop would fire a mechanic who tightened wheel nuts with an air gun, unless he used a torque stick between the socket and gun - that's a special extension that gives at a certain torque and won't tighten any further. And I always insist that they actually use a torque wrench on any of my cars I have in a shop.

If I were out on the road and had a flat in a car that happened to have a spare, then sure I would change a wheel without a torque wrench, and I'd tighten in judiciously, but would always use a torque wrench otherwise. Ah - I forgot - no one changes a flat on the road these days - they just get out their cell phone and calls up someone to do it for them....
And that is where I am the exception to the rule....even at 77 I change a flat providing a spare is available...cannot change this old dog.
 

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Me too. Last time I had a flat I had passing motorists offering me a cell to call a truck. I had a spare nd a jack, so I just changed it. Wondered why they seemed surprised.

Sadly, no such option with the Kappas (and many other modern cars).
 
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