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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Does anyone have a picture of the what the charge tubes and intercooler drain look like? Not sure what those are yet. Front bottom of the turbo has a lot of oil caked on it...
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Thought I had a compression tester but don't, so will rent one tomorrow. Pulled the plugs and #1 (front of engine) was oily black and fouled. The other 3 looked ok except all of them had oil around the threads.

Wife told me I'm freaking out and need to give it a rest today.
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Does anyone have a picture of the what the charge tubes and intercooler drain look like? Not sure what those are yet. Front bottom of the turbo has a lot of oil caked on it...
View attachment 117613

Thought I had a compression tester but don't, so will rent one tomorrow. Pulled the plugs and #1 (front of engine) was oily black and fouled. The other 3 looked ok except all of them had oil around the threads.

Wife told me I'm freaking out and need to give it a rest today. View attachment 117612

The charge pipes are basically the tubes after the turbo. Air into intake tube through turbo then into charge pipes, down to the intercooler out the intercooler to throttle body. Turbo takes a long path with a lot of pipes and connections.
The intercooler looks similar to the radiator it sits all the way in the front (cools the air coming out of the turbo). The hoses you can drain are right above the plastic cover under the front bumper. If you have oil or water in there definitely get it out. Once you look down there you will see the hoses pretty clearly.
I included a pic of the first charge pipe. The rubber boot on it says eng. If you have oil blowing past the turbo into the intercooler, you have a job ahead of you. Cleaning anyway..
 

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Funkadelic,

Looking at your spark plug pictures, the threads look very oily. When you removed the coils, were the spark plugs submerged in engine oil? If so, you need a new valve cover gasket.

Our non-turbo with 120,000 miles had oil flooding one spark plug seen here, the 2nd from left.
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The valve cover gasket also leaked badly up front making a lot of oily crud around the belt area in the front of the engine. I am not familiar with the turbo. Is it possible that the oily crud on your turbo is sourced from a leaking valve cover gasket?

Turbo or non-turbo, changing the valve cover gasket is simple, easily handled by a novice. A mechanic's trick to prevent leakage soon thereafter, is applying a dab of gasket maker moments prior to assembly, where the gasket makes sharp turns in the "Z" axis. In this picture of our 2.4L Sky, those places are marked in yellow. Apply dabs to both sides of the gasket, immediately assemble, then allow the gasket maker to cure overnight before starting the engine. Over time and temperature, the gasket shrinks ever-so slightly creating points of leakage in those corners. The dabs of gasket maker helps prevent that minor leakage from returning so quickly.

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I advise to replace your 4 spark plugs with the right type, replace a leaky valve cover gasket, then evaluate from there. If you are comfortable with the following, degrease your engine afterwards and watch where leaks return. Rule out obvious issues and see what issues resurface.

It sure does appear that one cylinder has some issues. But just maybe it takes many miles to fowl that plug. So you replace that plug once a year and enjoy your Sky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
Spark plugs didn't have oil elsewhere except for the threads. Looking down each spark plug valley, I could see a little bit of oil around the bottom edge. Coils were clean. There is oil residue along the front engine cover near the alternator...probably from those corners of the valve cover you circled in the picture. Planning to do the following tests tonight after work: compression test, coolant leak test, remove turbo intake and inspect shaft for play. I also cleaned the MAF sensor and putting in new plugs.

I'm confused on the PCV. Rock Auto lists two PCV valves and not sure which is correct. I ordered this one but not sure where it goes...
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This one with the hose was also listed. The one on my Sky is broken where it connects to the air intake. Looks like it's been glued at one point. Which one is the correct PCV?
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Forgot to add...I checked the oil at each stop on the way home, and each time I was getting some smoke out of the dipstick tube and the filler cap. Not sure if that indicates one possible issue over the other.
 

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Is It me, or are those plugs wrong?
unless 41-834 crosses to 41-108, those are wrong
you need a fresh set of 41-108’s
I noticed that too. They are the copper plugs for that engine. They are not iridium, but they are compatible (as per the auto parts stores) Do they run good? I do not know, copper is supposed to work better in a lot of applications over iridium.
With oil coming out of the dipstick did you change the pcv valve yet? If not remember to test the new one before install. Back in the day I can not tell you how many new pcv valves i bought that leaked right out of the box. ACDelco pcv is probably your best bet if the one you ordered leaks.
Stop by a GM and pick one up, will only probably be a few dollars more. If your RockAuto one leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I ordered the GM PCV valve. Did some more searching and looks like the PCV is inside the intake manifold. Need to remove the manifold, and it's buried in there between cylinders 2 & 3. I can handle that. I'll also try to fix the broken connection on the "PCV check valve" with the braided hose where it connects to the intake tube.

Really appreciate all of the help everyone has provided. You guys are great resources.
 

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....... I'll also try to fix the broken connection on the "PCV check valve" with the braided hose where it connects to the intake tube.
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My preferred fix for the breather to intake break is to drill each piece about an inch deep with a 1/4" drill bit, then insert a short piece of 1/4" copper tube to splice tham together. It is a tight fit and essentially invisible.
 

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The plugs are junk. I’d ditch those plugs and replace them with the 41-108 that should be in it.
I may be steering this away form the original topic, but why are the copper plugs garbage? How do they perform? Or are you just saying that his plugs are fouled and should be replaced?
I was planning on trying out the copper plugs. I had an eclipse gsx that loved copper plugs over the iridium. You could tell the difference immediately. Copper performed better but they don't last 100k miles like iridium. So for that car Copper was the better plug. Cheap doesn't mean bad though.
I am interested to hear how they performed for you and how much boost you run. Thanks in advance.
 

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I may be steering this away form the original topic, but why are the copper plugs garbage? How do they perform? Or are you just saying that his plugs are fouled and should be replaced?
I was planning on trying out the copper plugs. I had an eclipse gsx that loved copper plugs over the iridium. You could tell the difference immediately. Copper performed better but they don't last 100k miles like iridium. So for that car Copper was the better plug. Cheap doesn't mean bad though.
I am interested to hear how they performed for you and how much boost you run. Thanks in advance.
s
Should have clarified or separated, my bad. First comment in regards to condition, second, from what I’ve gathered here 41-108 are the way to go. I’ve run iridium in turbo and PD blower setups and never run into a problem.
 

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Iridium lasts longer than copper plugs. 100k vs 50k something like that.
Since changing plugs on this car is so easy, you can use copper plugs and change every 20k miles. Fresh plugs are always better than old stale ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Update...replaced valve cover gasket and spark plugs with the 41-108's. Also epoxy'd the pcv valve connector on the air intake. Looks like it had a previous fix with the small copper pipe inside. Have the intake manifold off and replaced the PCV valve. Just waiting for a new gasket to get here on Friday to reinstall.

Checked front of turbo when I had the intake hose off and thought there was a very small amount of play. Not sure what is normal. Going to check the intercooler tubes and drain anything out if needed, then get it out on the road and see if the smoke clears up any. The compression test shows cylinder 1 at 110 with the others at 150, so I'm hoping the rings will come around after the fixes. Or maybe the valve guides?
 

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Update...replaced valve cover gasket and spark plugs with the 41-108's. Also epoxy'd the pcv valve connector on the air intake. Looks like it had a previous fix with the small copper pipe inside. Have the intake manifold off and replaced the PCV valve. Just waiting for a new gasket to get here on Friday to reinstall.

Checked front of turbo when I had the intake hose off and thought there was a very small amount of play. Not sure what is normal. Going to check the intercooler tubes and drain anything out if needed, then get it out on the road and see if the smoke clears up any. The compression test shows cylinder 1 at 110 with the others at 150, so I'm hoping the rings will come around after the fixes. Or maybe the valve guides?
I would try adding Lucas engine oil treatment and also Lucas fuel additive. Maybe the two treatments will free up and/or clean up the problem piston ring(s) resulting in improved compression. No harm in performing such an affordable and harmless experiment. A lot of people swear by the Lucas products and they are affordably found in many stores, Menards being the place I buy the products from.

Last year my 122,000 mile base Sky was test driven by racing circuit engineer & engine rebuilder LEO FRANCHI. He recommended Lucas engine oil additive/treatment in my crank case with every oil change to manage potential engine sludge build-up, but more interesting to me was that he said to add a lot of extra Lucas fuel additive in the fuel tank as a one-time treatment, stating I really can't add too much....be very generous. Now he was talking about my "base" Sky. I don't know if he would feel the same with a RedLine turbo with direct injection.
 
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