Saturn Sky Forum banner
21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,878 Posts
Thanks everyone, also is that the fix for both codes? Replacing both the intake and exhaust solenoids?

The car is still throwing the P0302 that it originally was when I took it in haha..... Just took the car out to see if it would throw any more codes. The flashing CEL came on after a hard acceleration from 0-50 ish think it hit 16 PSI.

As of now the codes are

P0302(again)
P0011 -
I found a video for replacing the solenoids so Ill be doing those myself.
P0014
First, a flashing CEL is dangerous, it basically means "Stop what you are doing now, serious damage is possible!"

P0302 is a misfire in cylinder 2, and the solenoids will not fix it. The normal first check is to switch the coil packs between cylinder 2 and any other cylinder to see if the misfire follows the coil.

P0011 and P0014 are solenoid codes, and replacement will probably solve them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,019 Posts
Put the black one on the intake side and the gray one on the exhaust side. The upper picture shows them in the wrong locations.
 

·
Registered
2008 RL
Joined
·
90 Posts
Doubt it fixes a single cylinder misfire.

Since you have new coils and plugs, assuming there is no installation error, you are more likely pointing towards a dirty valve or injector.

As they mentioned, the pic above is just to show you where the solenoids are, so you can do it yourself. They were just stolen from the HHR site, so dont use them as a guide for install colors.

BTW: dont touch your coils or plugs. You should have a minimum 12month/12k mile warranty on work performed. If theyre bad, the shop needs to make it right. If you swap stuff around and admit to it, theyll try to claim you broke a connector just to weasel out of warranty.

You paid ~$400 for plugs coil and diagnosis. They owe you that much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Doubt it fixes a single cylinder misfire.

Since you have new coils and plugs, assuming there is no installation error, you are more likely pointing towards a dirty valve or injector.

As they mentioned, the pic above is just to show you where the solenoids are, so you can do it yourself. They were just stolen from the HHR site, so dont use them as a guide for install colors.

BTW: dont touch your coils or plugs. You should have a minimum 12month/12k mile warranty on work performed. If theyre bad, the shop needs to make it right. If you swap stuff around and admit to it, theyll try to claim you broke a connector just to weasel out of warranty.

You paid ~$400 for plugs coil and diagnosis. They owe you that much.
Hi, I have a 2007 Sky Redline and I've had it looked at twice now for a P0302 code that was supposedly fixed. Each time I took it back to the mechanic. Basically the check engine light came on every time I was driving home from the shop (shop was about 30 miles away). In the first visit to the shop I got the car back and it was rough idling which it didn't do previously. The second time I picked it up, the check engine light immediately began flashing as soon as I accelerated onto the the highway off of a ramp and then stayed lit. I wasn't driving it hard, the boost didn't even hit 7PSI.

Below is the image of the service details provided by the shop.
View attachment 115784

Anyways, the point of this post was to see if there were any known mechanics or shops that people have taken their Sky Redlines in and left happy with no problems. I am in the Central Florida area and have means to get the car to the right place in order to fix it. From what I understand, this is the same engine in the Cobalt SS cars, I was curious if Chevy dealers would look at the engine to figure out what's wrong.
hey. Can you call me 407-415-5518. I have an 08 that was doing the same thing. I can Leo you but it’s a ton of stuff to write. Such an easy fix it will blow your mind!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,878 Posts
hey. Can you call me . I have an 08 that was doing the same thing. I can Leo you but it’s a ton of stuff to write. Such an easy fix it will blow your mind!
An easy fix should be easy to type, and I'm certain that the rest of the forum would be interested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Just an update, I was able to contact Bill Lewis and he fixed the p0302 code, apparently the clip on one of the solenoids was busted so I think that's causing one of the P0011 or P0014 codes. Bill replaced both the solenoids but the codes are still here. We are assuming it's cause the clips from the wires aren't making good enough connection.

I also have a u0073 code that is new, I read a little about it and it said I could ignore it? A bit unsure about that though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,488 Posts
....apparently the clip on one of the solenoids was busted....
I recently changed my 2.4L valve cover gasket which required disconnecting the wiring to the intake and exhaust solenoids. My intake solenoid electrical connector latching feature was partially broken and brittle. As careful as I was, I broke off what remained. I feared buying a 2nd-hand connector would become brittle in short time. The best solution was to buy a new connector with pigtails. I bought THIS ONE FOR $51.24 ON EBAY which is exclusively for the intake solenoid. The exhaust solenoid takes a different connector which is much more abundant and also much more affordable.

To install it....
  • I unwrapped the wire harness some inches to a good point
  • I cut the two original wires in staggered fashion
  • I cut the new pigtailed connector to match the length of the original discarded one +1"
  • I slipped shrink tubing over each wire
  • I soldered each connection
  • I slipped the shrink tubing over the raw connections and heated to shrink them
  • I re-wrapped the wire harness
  • Finally, using permanent markers I colored the exposed new wire insulation by the connector to the original colors so in the future if studying a wiring diagram, there would be no confusion over mismatched colors.
 

·
Registered
2008 RL
Joined
·
90 Posts
Dont cut the wires. Solder just introduces a brittle cracking point, so most OEMS prohibit any solder. Especially in hot high vibration applications. When that is not possible, they prefer you to use a proper crimp.

The pins/wires push out of the old connector, and into a new bare connector shell.

Intake connector part numbers
13587320
PT2796 ac delco
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Dont cut the wires. Solder just introduces a brittle cracking point, so most OEMS prohibit any solder. Especially in hot high vibration applications. When that is not possible, they prefer you to use a proper crimp.

The pins/wires push out of the old connector, and into a new bare connector shell.

Intake connector part numbers
13587320
PT2796 ac delco
Is this for both solenoids?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,878 Posts
Is this for both solenoids?
The technique is the same for both, but the parts are different.

@joseph84 : I totally agree with you at a technical level, but forum-wide experience contradicts the anti-soldering philosophy.

The GMPP tune kit for the LNF came with new MAP sensor connectors that were to be crimped onto the wiring after cutting off the old connectors. Those crimps have repeatedly failed, but there have been no reported failures of the solder joints that were used to replace them.

Swapping the existing pins into the new body makes perfect sense, but only if the two connectors are actually compatible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,488 Posts
The pins/wires push out of the old connector, and into a new bare connector shell.
That was my first idea. I bought THIS SET of connector pin-release tools but was not successful at removing the individual pins to swap outer shells (with the latch) so I went to plan B, soldering.

I disagree that a crimped connection is preferred over a good proper solder joint and insulated with shrink tubing. I have had numerous crimped connections fail, never a good solder joint and properly insulated.

Maybe soldering is not recommended because too many people don't know how to solder properly. A bad solder joint can be unreliable if.....
  • The iron is not hot enough
  • The solder is lead-free
  • There is a lack of flux
  • Using too little or too much solder
  • The wires are not twisted properly
  • The wire ends are left as spears that pierce the insulation
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
6,878 Posts
That was my first idea. I bought THIS SET of connector pin-release tools but was not successful at removing the individual pins to swap outer shells (with the latch) so I went to plan B, soldering.

I disagree that a crimped connection is preferred over a good proper solder joint and insulated with shrink tubing. I have had numerous crimped connections fail, never a good solder joint and properly insulated.

Maybe soldering is not recommended because too many people don't know how to solder properly. A bad solder joint can be unreliable if.....
  • The iron is not hot enough
  • The solder is lead-free
  • There is a lack of flux
  • Using too little or too much solder
  • The wires are not twisted properly
  • The wire ends are left as spears that pierce the insulation
Mil-spec wiring specifically prohibits soldered joints in most applications because solder forms a brittle joint that can cause the wires to crack and fail when subjected to vibration. I agree that bad crimping is worse than bad soldering in most applications, but good crimping, using the proper tools, is actually better.
 

·
Registered
2008 RL
Joined
·
90 Posts
Is this for both solenoids?
No, that is the intake solenoid.

__
JohnWR/rjgramps, I kind of agree with part of the bad crimp experiences. A mixture of improper tool and improper part. Even the butt connectors included in the cam solenoid connector kit. Not good.

Oval die crimpers (autoparts store) and plastic sheathed butt connectors produce an unpredictable crimp. Maybe it will hold, maybe it wont. You've seen these types fail.

So I should have qualified that with bare seamless or bare open barrel crimp, with the correct dimple or W crimper. And then beloved adhesive lined heatshrink.





Semi specialized, but much cheaper than my Hakko 888 iron. Produces a stronger electrical and mechanical connection than a good solder joint, definitely better than a bad joint. There is a mechanical pull test, voltage drop test, heat and or vibration/flex test depending on industry. Solder wont pass.

Within prior employment, I did replace many solder repair joints with crimps, and was employed by one of those "thou shall not solder" employers who obsessed over reliability and warranty.

It is fair to point out that in some applications, soldered wires dont get hot enough or vibrate enough, and are therefore "good enough". ie GMPP MAP. Good enough, will not cut out solder to replace with crimp. If its already been soldered, I leave it alone. I had a brittle soldered battery connection, with cracked soldered strands for years. But it worked.

In cases where 2 new wires need to be joined, there is not any justification or reason to actively choose solder, and a few to not.


____
TL/DR.
If your wires are already soldered, leave them alone. If you have more wires to join in the future, use appropriate crimps. If you are average person or professional, the $30-45 crimpers are going to take you further than your old weller.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
In my case, I had the GMPP kit installed by a Saturn dealer who did the crimp thing. I then had LOTS of problems with the sensors not being read properly. I asked them to solder the connections (as other people here had reported issues with the crimps). They resisted (saying that crimping was better), but after I insisted they supposedly did the soldering.

The problems continued, with the mechanic basically saying "see, it wasn't the crimping". Eventually, that dealership (along with the rest of Saturn) was gone and I started taking my car to a Chevy dealer. After many attempted fixes, I mentioned the crimping/soldering issue again, and their guy said that "no, those connections aren't soldered - it's just a crimp". Sure enough, the soldering was never done.

The new guy re-did the connections (soldering and wrapped), and I never had those issues again.

For my new Sky, I went with the Trifecta tune, and didn't touch the sensors at all - just seemed safer that way.
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top