Saturn Sky Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy all;
Got a 2008 Redline with a manual trans coming to my house, it has a salvage title due to theft, but is otherwise a good car with just 71K miles, and a dripping water pump. Since I have to dig into the car to replace the water pump anyway, should I be fixing anything else while I am in there? I heard the timing plastic parts are a problem, or is that just on older models, or ones with high mileage? What about the coolant hoses?
Of course, I will also change the plugs and engine oil, but what more?
Let me know,
thanks.
Roger In Kansas
 

· Registered
Joined
·
581 Posts
Makes sense to do the timing chains/sprockets/tensioners while you’re in there. Might as well throw in a thermostat for good measure but make sure you get an AC Delco. Serpentine belts and inspect the hoses. Lower is NLA, but Rock Auto has them from time to time for the Red Line. 2.4 item is not the same.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,014 Posts
Congratulations on the new ride! The “while you’re in there” approach can get to a pretty long list fast. There really isn’t a right or wrong list, but I can speak from experience. I noticed our ‘08 RL was loosing coolant shortly after we purchased it at 60k miles in 2020. I couldn't find any leaks around the WP or anywhere else, then the leak suddenly went away. I ignored it for another 3k miles/ 1 year until it came back this time heavy enough to see it was the WP. I replaced the WP, thermostat, coolant sensor, and various gaskets and seals while I had that area pulled apart. It’s a tight area (especially on turbo cars) and really does make sense to replace parts while you can. I put it all back together and had no issues.

Then I nrelated, about 3 or 4 months later I decided to replace my VVT solenoids to see if it would fix the clunk when the auto was downshifting at low speeds. I discovered they had lots of fine metal shavings on the screens and figured out pretty quickly I had a timing chain guide that failed and the chain was grinding on the guide bolt. It never made a sound or did anything else to indicate failure. I had to tear down the front of the engine along with the radiator to replace the timing/balance chain much more than I did the WP. I ended up replacing most of the sprockets, guides, bolts, gaskets, etc. I also did the belts while I was there too and very seriously considered replacing the pulleys, but they seemed to be fine so I didn’t.

The moral of the story is both are parts that seem to be failing due to age vs mileage, so maybe not a bad idea to plan on replacing both to save some time, but keep in mind you can replace either independently without doing the other. They require different areas and parts to be pulled too for the most part. I would argue if you’re doing the timing chains, then someone should very seriously consider replacing the WP “while they’re in there”, but not necessarily replacing the chains when doing the WP.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
If you are having to replace the water pump- which can be expensive if done by a shop
or dealer, the labor rates can be shocking to the new owner just say'n. If you are doing
the work yourself with maybe an extra pair of hands can save money, but increase the
personal frustration level. The Coolant system on the Redline- 71K I agree with others here.
New thermostat, hoses & belts, gaskets & fluids- a onetime pain in the ass and to your wallet.
You don't want to have to come back to this area again.

If you're going to go for it- and your bottom line will allow it, since you are tearing down the
front half of the engine- the timing chain, guides, tensioners, gasket/seals/bolts/sprockets
should be given an upgrade for the piece of mind for the miles ahead.
I would check the VVT solenoids first for any metal shavings.

These are kind of cheap & easy parts to replace now- check Rock Auto and might give you some indication of any wear & tear to the timing chain area before the WP tear down does happen for real.

Welcome to the forum & ownership club. Much knowledge here from our owners to help you
with any issues you might have. Research this forum in the search community feature can
help you out- but if you need extra help with something ask away.


LAC
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all of you for the great advise. I am fortunate that I have a mechanic buddy that works for cash on the side, cut rate, and is familiar with working on these machines, as his buddy has a redline too, and they have been modified it for street performance over the last couple years. Though it is cold in Kansas right now, I do have a heated garage, which should keep the job from becoming "too much until spring". Thanks again to all !! Roger
 

· Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
My two cents are this: parts are cheap, labor isn’t……why do things twice? I’d buy as much stuff to put in there NOW while it’s torn apart, then to have to pull it apart twice.

case in point, there are three O rings on my rear cycle rim. They’re $3 to $7, and don’t really need to be changed every tire replacement, but IF one of those O rings goes bad, and allows contaminants in, it’ll ruin the drive spline which is getting hard to find, so, that $15 or so on O rings is cheap insurance.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have an update. My mechanic went through the car, nothing in the oil and nothing on the VVT screens. So far, nothing wrong at all except the water pump leaking when it gets hot. Oh, we did have to replace the radiator fan controller, but from the forum I found out the controller modules goes bad, and you can get an identical one for a Ford, off ebay for $17. So, got the pump on order and a Gates thermostat, and some belts. I was going to replace the radiator hoses, but the last lower just sold on rock auto.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
I have an update. My mechanic went through the car, nothing in the oil and nothing on the VVT screens. So far, nothing wrong at all except the water pump leaking when it gets hot. Oh, we did have to replace the radiator fan controller, but from the forum I found out the controller modules goes bad, and you can get an identical one for a Ford, off ebay for $17. So, got the pump on order and a Gates thermostat, and some belts. I was going to replace the radiator hoses, but the last lower just sold on rock auto.
you are asking for trouble with a gates t/stat
most folks on the forum recommend an ac/delco/oem thermostat,with a small hole drilled in it.
lots of discussions on this.just my own 2 cents worth from all iv'e read.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
you are asking for trouble with a gates t/stat
most folks on the forum recommend an ac/delco/oem thermostat,with a small hole drilled in it.
lots of discussions on this.just my own 2 cents worth from all iv'e read.
Thanks
The AC Delco runs $66, for a $3 part. My mechanic buddy knows about adding the air hole, I guess our car is not the only one with that kind of issue.
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
8,877 Posts
Thanks
The AC Delco runs $66, for a $3 part. My mechanic buddy knows about adding the air hole, I guess our car is not the only one with that kind of issue.
Gates 'stats have been known to fail shortly after replacement, the ACDelco have not. You can take your chances with the cheaper option, but our experience says that you will be doing this again before long if you do.

Drilling holes in thermostats is an older trick than any of us, my father taught it to me like his taught him. It aids in getting the air out of the system but after that is unnecessary.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
581 Posts
Thanks
The AC Delco runs $66, for a $3 part. My mechanic buddy knows about adding the air hole, I guess our car is not the only one with that kind of issue.
Shop around for the AC Delco. You won’t get it for three bucks. If it fails, that little hole isn’t going to be much help.
Cheap insurance for having the prospect of doing it twice.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top