Saturn Sky Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Mine were cracked but not falling apart when I bought the car (probably from improper lifting). Then I drove into a gravel parking lot and rode up and down onto a tree stump they hadn't leveled out.

That made a giant mess of little fiberglass parts, and with the rains here, was tired of getting water and dirt up into the engine bay.

Ordered in July, received in September - Call Norm rather than email or Facebook (which is how I first contacted him). The workmanship is great. He took the VIN and the silver paint matched up pretty well. The fenders did not need any modification to install other than moving all the original clips and weather-strip to the new ones, just need to know where to start after you remove the old ones.

Before you remove the old one, just take a long look at how it's all aligned, and how big the gaps should be, do one fender at a time so it's fresh in your head. It takes about 45 minutes a side.
  1. Once you have moved the 5 clips over, I suggest you start with the top 7mm bolt closest to the door to align the gap and body lines. Lightly tighten it when you are close. Put the other top 7mm bolt in lightly just to keep it from falling.
  2. Work on the rear bottom bolt (10mm, longer of 2), and bring it in to position while keeping an eye on the gaps between the door. You will need to push the lower part inwards to line up the threaded hole to the rear bottom bolt.
  3. Work your way forward with the front bottom 10mm bolt, as well as the 7mm bolt that goes into the clip through the black plastic liner. The lower bolts can be tightened up fully.*
  4. Lightly tighten all 4 fender liner 7mm bolts, and also the top front bolt - the fender should still be able to adjust but require a bit of force to slide.
  5. Carefully open the door while paying attention to the 2 points where it can get close to impeding on the new fender - around the top trailing edge/point, and at the lower triangle that bumps out of the door as well as the fender. If it moves without touching, and you like the amount of panel gap, you can start to make some finer adjustments.
  6. On mine, the mid point, trailing edge was bumping out a bit even though the bottom and top of door looked great. You can now put the last 10mm bolt through the door frame and tighten the last bolt while pushing in at the trailing edge of fender (or pulling out if you have concavity). Make sure again that the door swings freely with at least some gap throughout it's swing.
  7. Slide in the slotted rubber blocks on top that keep the hood from hitting the fender.
  8. Don't drop the hood to latch it, but rather get it to where it might close but only push down at the fender mating edge to get an idea of how parallel the lines are. You may find you need to move the front top of fender outwards or inwards. Make your adjustments starting with the top bolt, tightening as you get closer. Once its good, tighten the 4 fender liner bolts.
*If you had damage to the metal rod mounts that hold the lower part of the fender, you will need to bend them back in the opposite motion of the damage - I just had to pull it straight down and it lined up great.

9. The rubber weather-stripping was pretty easy to remove by just digging it away with your fingers in the hot sun. Once pulled off, you need to take off all the old adhesive. Hot soapy water and fingernails and about 15 minutes of time cleaned them to the point where they could be reused. Use 3M double-sided body moulding tape to reattach. I found it best to lay it on the new fender, and trim using an x-acto blade along the inside 90 degree turn, which gave me about 3/8" strip of tape surface. Pull the plastic off and place the cleaned up rubber weather-strip.

Now you can drop the hood normally and take a look all around to make sure it looks aligned. Don't drop the hood without the weather-strip and especially the 2 blocks not in place, and of course only drop the hood if the door is closed.

Repeat for the other side.

113825
113826
113827
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,743 Posts
Car looks great. I would keep the originals. They can be fixed.
Throw them away...u don't want to fix them...but keep the chicklets...many owners removed them. They no longer install them on GM vehicles...if u look at older Corvettes, they are placed just behind the doors...near the rear wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Throw them away...u don't want to fix them...but keep the chicklets...many owners removed them. They no longer install them on GM vehicles...if u look at older Corvettes, they are placed just behind the doors...near the rear wheels.
Took a minute but I think you are talking about the GM badge. Yeah I think I will keep them just in case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
I removed my two GM chicklets. Our high mileage Sky that had been kept outdoors most of it's life, required a good paint restoration polishing, so I removed them for much better results. I did the same to the "SKY" name on the rear bumper. Once done, I quickly concluded our dark ming blue Sky looked cleaner without those eye-catching thingies. It was not important to me to keep our Sky "original" in that regard. The car has more significant deviations that lowered their importance, most notable the leather seating surfaces and instrument cluster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I removed my two GM chicklets. Our high mileage Sky that had been kept outdoors most of it's life, required a good paint restoration polishing, so I removed them for much better results. I did the same to the "SKY" name on the rear bumper. Once done, I quickly concluded our dark ming blue Sky looked cleaner without those eye-catching thingies. It was not important to me to keep our Sky "original" in that regard. The car has more significant deviations that lowered their importance, most notable the leather seating surfaces and instrument cluster.
Good idea, I would like to see any pics of the seats and instrument cluster if you have them.

My seat back (and bottom) is worn and loose, and on bumps the car feels disconnected - but it's really just the seat. If you lean forward just before the bump it feels fine. So I will be replacing with Planted seat bracket adapters (they only list availability for the Solstice) and these Amazon seats with included sliders that I watched 2 Vette owners have great success with. Passenger seat supposedly has to go in the drivers side and vice versa so the recline mechanism goes towards the center tunnel.

113831
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Mine were cracked but not falling apart when I bought the car (probably from improper lifting). Then I drove into a gravel parking lot and rode up and down onto a tree stump they hadn't leveled out.

That made a giant mess of little fiberglass parts, and with the rains here, was tired of getting water and dirt up into the engine bay.

Ordered in July, received in September - Call Norm rather than email or Facebook (which is how I first contacted him). The workmanship is great. He took the VIN and the silver paint matched up pretty well. The fenders did not need any modification to install other than moving all the original clips and weather-strip to the new ones, just need to know where to start after you remove the old ones.

Before you remove the old one, just take a long look at how it's all aligned, and how big the gaps should be, do one fender at a time so it's fresh in your head. It takes about 45 minutes a side.
  1. Once you have moved the 5 clips over, I suggest you start with the top 7mm bolt closest to the door to align the gap and body lines. Lightly tighten it when you are close. Put the other top 7mm bolt in lightly just to keep it from falling.
  2. Work on the rear bottom bolt (10mm, longer of 2), and bring it in to position while keeping an eye on the gaps between the door. You will need to push the lower part inwards to line up the threaded hole to the rear bottom bolt.
  3. Work your way forward with the front bottom 10mm bolt, as well as the 7mm bolt that goes into the clip through the black plastic liner. The lower bolts can be tightened up fully.*
  4. Lightly tighten all 4 fender liner 7mm bolts, and also the top front bolt - the fender should still be able to adjust but require a bit of force to slide.
  5. Carefully open the door while paying attention to the 2 points where it can get close to impeding on the new fender - around the top trailing edge/point, and at the lower triangle that bumps out of the door as well as the fender. If it moves without touching, and you like the amount of panel gap, you can start to make some finer adjustments.
  6. On mine, the mid point, trailing edge was bumping out a bit even though the bottom and top of door looked great. You can now put the last 10mm bolt through the door frame and tighten the last bolt while pushing in at the trailing edge of fender (or pulling out if you have concavity). Make sure again that the door swings freely with at least some gap throughout it's swing.
  7. Slide in the slotted rubber blocks on top that keep the hood from hitting the fender.
  8. Don't drop the hood to latch it, but rather get it to where it might close but only push down at the fender mating edge to get an idea of how parallel the lines are. You may find you need to move the front top of fender outwards or inwards. Make your adjustments starting with the top bolt, tightening as you get closer. Once its good, tighten the 4 fender liner bolts.
*If you had damage to the metal rod mounts that hold the lower part of the fender, you will need to bend them back in the opposite motion of the damage - I just had to pull it straight down and it lined up great.

9. The rubber weather-stripping was pretty easy to remove by just digging it away with your fingers in the hot sun. Once pulled off, you need to take off all the old adhesive. Hot soapy water and fingernails and about 15 minutes of time cleaned them to the point where they could be reused. Use 3M double-sided body moulding tape to reattach. I found it best to lay it on the new fender, and trim using an x-acto blade along the inside 90 degree turn, which gave me about 3/8" strip of tape surface. Pull the plastic off and place the cleaned up rubber weather-strip.

Now you can drop the hood normally and take a look all around to make sure it looks aligned. Don't drop the hood without the weather-strip and especially the 2 blocks not in place, and of course only drop the hood if the door is closed.

Repeat for the other side.

View attachment 113825 View attachment 113826 View attachment 113827
I truly love the look! Well done Sir!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,188 Posts
Good idea, I would like to see any pics of the seats and instrument cluster if you have them.
......
Because I happen to have some free time in front of the computer:

 
  • Like
Reactions: a280z

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,368 Posts
Guessing here, but most original fenders are broken. Many of the remaining have been repaired. It the car were to ever be of value, aftermarket fenders will be a hit. I have a set of Norm's on my car, but they took a lot of work. I bought them thru a second party. I have the original fenders off of my car and several sets I have had repaired. Keeping original equipment is important to some, others not so much. I have original equipment on the other two. I know the fenders on the Ruby Red that I am looking at are in bad shape. So will have a stock set to replace them.

Put them up in the attic. Ten years from now, might not be a Norm or DDM making fenders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Because I happen to have some free time in front of the computer:

Thanks JohnWR! I went to look at showcase/garage but didn't see anything. RJGramps, that looks really good! Love how the seats turned out, and the interior lighting makes more difference than I expected.

Skersfan, Agreed, I'm not throwing anything out. I even have all the little bits of fiberglass that I could find and the metal bracket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
Thanks JohnWR for saving me the effort.

We've driven some miles now in our rebuilt seats and with the interior lighting enhancements.

Regarding the new 100% leather seat skins, the perforated leather inset portions along with the rest being real leather too, the seats are quite comfortable compared to the originals. I did also add more poly-fill to build up the sides & bolters which makes the seats cradle us better. I am really glad I made that change. And I couldn't beat the price. To make them "Even More" affordable, I later sold the original seat skins on eBay. Taking pictures of the old seat skins while still on the seats helped make a sale happen. So in the end, the cost of the project was reduced by roughly $100. The net worth of my time cannot be tabulated.

Regarding the interior lighting enhancements, that too was a real winner for us, and I am not quite done yet. The big hitters are done and "WE CAN SEE" when driving our Sky at night. We were running blind before, in-part due to some burnt-out bulbs and non-illuminated radio buttons. What started out as a bulb-replacement and radio repair project, quickly turned into an obsession with daylight LEDs. The bright day-light illumination is exactly what our "senior" eyes needed with an all black interior at night. I "Very Highly" recommend incorporating floor and glove box lighting.

The gauge cluster was a project all in itself. The $165 investment into that was a sure winner. I am so glad I took a leap of faith and made that change to the instrument panel.

The remaining things I'd like to convert to LED over the coming winter are....
  • Adding door lock switches with LED illumination/conversion (our early-made Sky lacks those switches), though I still need to secure the parts.
  • Convert the steering wheel buttons and the fog light button to daylight LED to match.
I have learned that over-bright LEDs for a particular application, can be easily dimmed by using a black permanent marker. Just put a dot on the top of the LED.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Mine were cracked but not falling apart when I bought the car (probably from improper lifting). Then I drove into a gravel parking lot and rode up and down onto a tree stump they hadn't leveled out.

That made a giant mess of little fiberglass parts, and with the rains here, was tired of getting water and dirt up into the engine bay.

Ordered in July, received in September - Call Norm rather than email or Facebook (which is how I first contacted him). The workmanship is great. He took the VIN and the silver paint matched up pretty well. The fenders did not need any modification to install other than moving all the original clips and weather-strip to the new ones, just need to know where to start after you remove the old ones.

Before you remove the old one, just take a long look at how it's all aligned, and how big the gaps should be, do one fender at a time so it's fresh in your head. It takes about 45 minutes a side.
  1. Once you have moved the 5 clips over, I suggest you start with the top 7mm bolt closest to the door to align the gap and body lines. Lightly tighten it when you are close. Put the other top 7mm bolt in lightly just to keep it from falling.
  2. Work on the rear bottom bolt (10mm, longer of 2), and bring it in to position while keeping an eye on the gaps between the door. You will need to push the lower part inwards to line up the threaded hole to the rear bottom bolt.
  3. Work your way forward with the front bottom 10mm bolt, as well as the 7mm bolt that goes into the clip through the black plastic liner. The lower bolts can be tightened up fully.*
  4. Lightly tighten all 4 fender liner 7mm bolts, and also the top front bolt - the fender should still be able to adjust but require a bit of force to slide.
  5. Carefully open the door while paying attention to the 2 points where it can get close to impeding on the new fender - around the top trailing edge/point, and at the lower triangle that bumps out of the door as well as the fender. If it moves without touching, and you like the amount of panel gap, you can start to make some finer adjustments.
  6. On mine, the mid point, trailing edge was bumping out a bit even though the bottom and top of door looked great. You can now put the last 10mm bolt through the door frame and tighten the last bolt while pushing in at the trailing edge of fender (or pulling out if you have concavity). Make sure again that the door swings freely with at least some gap throughout it's swing.
  7. Slide in the slotted rubber blocks on top that keep the hood from hitting the fender.
  8. Don't drop the hood to latch it, but rather get it to where it might close but only push down at the fender mating edge to get an idea of how parallel the lines are. You may find you need to move the front top of fender outwards or inwards. Make your adjustments starting with the top bolt, tightening as you get closer. Once its good, tighten the 4 fender liner bolts.
*If you had damage to the metal rod mounts that hold the lower part of the fender, you will need to bend them back in the opposite motion of the damage - I just had to pull it straight down and it lined up great.

9. The rubber weather-stripping was pretty easy to remove by just digging it away with your fingers in the hot sun. Once pulled off, you need to take off all the old adhesive. Hot soapy water and fingernails and about 15 minutes of time cleaned them to the point where they could be reused. Use 3M double-sided body moulding tape to reattach. I found it best to lay it on the new fender, and trim using an x-acto blade along the inside 90 degree turn, which gave me about 3/8" strip of tape surface. Pull the plastic off and place the cleaned up rubber weather-strip.

Now you can drop the hood normally and take a look all around to make sure it looks aligned. Don't drop the hood without the weather-strip and especially the 2 blocks not in place, and of course only drop the hood if the door is closed.

Repeat for the other side.

View attachment 113825 View attachment 113826 View attachment 113827
Was wondering what the finish is on your driveway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Was wondering what the finish is on your driveway.
After moving to FL in 2015 we finally purchased a home this year (closing was right after almost all our co-workers and wife lost jobs due to covid :cry:). Tried to get out of it but it would have cost even more. I only mention that because we didn't do it, or even think to do something like it. We do like it. I believe its acid stained, resurfaced concrete, with a sort of medallion/guitar motif sandblasted into the center. All of it appears top coated with some clear slick ass sealer/coating that will make you fall on your ass in the rain, and don't try to stop too hard with the car or your will sail through the garage door. Maybe it will mold less, it's so humid here!
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top