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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
I would swap your T-stat.

I would regularly run in the low 200s-to 210s all the time regardless of ambient temps. I changed my t-stat when I did the WP and now I'm running in the 190s consistently. Downside is IIRC you have a RL and it's the hardest t-stat to change because of the extra hoses. It's honestly fairly difficult to get the rear bolt off of the t-stat cover. There's only 2, but that one is in a weird angle and most likely the hose clamp will be in the way of getting a good grip. You have to spin the hose clamp and then you can get a better grip, but a wobble extension still helps.

This is the t-stat I used.
The service manual says to remove the exhaust manifold to replace the thermostat- did you have to do that ?

sorry I see now that was to replace the housing also- I see how to remove just the tstat now
 

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Strange Amazon says that does not fit my Saturn sky - but it’s the same number rock auto gives me so it’s on its way
Is there a thermostat housing gasket as well ?
Amazon says a lot of things fit that don't and things that don't fit, but do. This is one of those times it says it doesn't, but I assure you it does. I installed it in my car as has plenty of others. If you order that thermostat it has everything that you need for the replacement.

I pulled mine only because I was doing the WP anyway. I put both in a pot and compared the opening between the two and the new was much faster at opening and also opened wider than the original. I put both side by side and very minimal difference. The old one is on the right in the first couple pics.

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The service manual says to remove the exhaust manifold to replace the thermostat- did you have to do that ?

sorry I see now that was to replace the housing also- I see how to remove just the tstat now
No reason to pull the exhaust manifold to get to the thermostat. You do need to pull the wiper arms, the cowl, and then that exposes the thermostat housing. You will most likely have to spin the hose clamp on the hose closest to the engine a few degrees otherwise it's in the way of the rear t-stat cover bolt. It's just two bolts, but the rear bolt is tricky because the angle. The front is easy. Clean both mating surfaces well before reinstalling and then you're done. Bleeding the air out of the coolant is the next tricky part. What sounds like a 30 minute job in the description will actually take you probably 2 hours FWIW.

Oh and is dexcool recommended ?
If you drain all of the coolant you can use another compatible coolant, but the two times I've done my coolant I just used store brand "dex-cool" 50/50 orange coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
No reason to pull the exhaust manifold to get to the thermostat. You do need to pull the wiper arms, the cowl, and then that exposes the thermostat housing. You will most likely have to spin the hose clamp on the hose closest to the engine a few degrees otherwise it's in the way of the rear t-stat cover bolt. It's just two bolts, but the rear bolt is tricky because the angle. The front is easy. Clean both mating surfaces well before reinstalling and then you're done. Bleeding the air out of the coolant is the next tricky part. What sounds like a 30 minute job in the description will actually take you probably 2 hours FWIW.



If you drain all of the coolant you can use another compatible coolant, but the two times I've done my coolant I just used store brand "dex-cool" 50/50 orange coolant.
Thank you Steve !
 

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Do you have the check valves installed? Really sound like trapped air.
Yeah - this!

My symptoms were exactly like yours until I had the TSB bulletin in hand and had the valves installed in the heater hoses. Fixed the problem immediately.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Yeah - this!

My symptoms were exactly like yours until I had the TSB bulletin in hand and had the valves installed in the heater hoses. Fixed the problem immediately.
Only thing is - I do get heat from
The heater and the overheat 235-245 only
Happens some days and not others - and didn’t happen all summer - I will research the check valves and see if they are available and if I can install them myself
 

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Here you go. My car was going up to 260 F when it was below freezing outside! I had to educate the dealer about the TSB
 

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When the valves came out they cost $800 Can. (and around $500 US) We never did figure out why. They finally came down to being available on Amazon for under $20!
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Just ordered the two check valves $15 each at Amazon and they’ll be here tomorrow. I’ll probably change the tstat and the valves so I won’t know what was the issue but hopefully it will be gone

sitting in thedriveway right now idling and it won’t get over 194 - either therm didnt Close from the ride home (temp was 135 when I started idling it) or there’s no air bubble in the heater core at this moment- or it’s just because it’s just idling and not under load

wanted to see if I had heat to check for an air filled heater core and I do have heat but it’s also not overheating so the “air bubble” may just not be in the core presently. So it should be one or the otherso fixing both isn’t A bad plan on my mind - hopefully I can do it Saturday and hopefully my buddy’s vacuum bleeder has the correct end for this car
 

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Why don't you just install the valves and see what happens. Otherwise you will never know......
 

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Bleed the system first before changing anything.
If that doesn't work install the valves, bleed again. Then change the thermostat as the last resort.
 

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I changed the thermostat, coolant temp sensor and radiator fan relay module on my 07 Redline for about $45..... fixed all my cooling issues..... The Redline is a P-I-A to reach the thermostat on the back of the engine....but doable with basic hand tools.....The base Sky is much easier I'm told..... I just ran it for a couple of times in my driveway and the coolant burped out all the air just fine.... just have to watch it..... I did it myself and I'm no Rocket Surgeon.
 

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At first when I read this- it sounded like a stuck thermostat was the issue.
An air bubble trapped in the high part of our system- when the heater core is used.
With no loss of coolant- in the reservoir tank or on the ground it wasn't the WP going out.

High temps in the summer or high temps in the winter- high temperatures are never a good thing.
What is- to high for our cars? 235- 245? 260? Our car does run above what we owners think is
normal to us, sometimes shocking new owners not use to these high temp read outs in the DIC.

Current mileage? No high temps ever before during your ownership?
Has the coolant ever been changed out completely and replaced before?
IF not do so now. 5 years max life no matter what. When idling not under load
normal temp ranges the DIC should be low here, driving normally 194-205 should be the norm.
Slog up hill on hot day- expect your temps to rise with the transmission strain into 210-217 range.
The cool down times vary with our cars- 3 minutes you should see coolant temps drop back to normal.
The radiator fan works- which is a good thing. Air bubble, no fan operation, no check valves, suspect
old thermostat, unknown coolant condition, known WP failure of the model- old parts & time plus
wear and tear can cause issues to the owner/operator.

I don't like high temps, that kinda thing warps certain motor parts which is expensive.
Replace your fluid, install the check valves, & thermostat- then see what your temps are?
Consumable items- brake pads, tires, battery, hoses & belts, fluids, rubber gaskets &
seals- weather stripping, the odd canvas top- the list can be endless for us.

Luck with your adventure.

LAC
 

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Are these temperature issues exclusively with the 2.0L turbo? Or do 2.4L n/a base owners experience the same?

I have never seen our 2007 high mileage base Sky display concerning temp numbers discussed here, nor have I ever heard the radiator fan turn on. The car included no meaningful maintenance history when we bought it two years ago with 119,000 miles. I fear introducing air into the system when changing fluid. This past spring I instead slowly drained the coolant out the bottom of the radiator while adding new fluid in the reservoir. I plan to repeat this process next spring and again the following spring for a total of 3 times in what will likely be within a 2000 mile driving period (1000 miles per year).

Our base Sky was missing the under-the-radiator air scoop of which I installed a new one last spring. But I see no difference in operating temps with or without it.

I wonder if other base 2.4L n/a Sky owners have cooling issues. Am I just lucky?
 

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Are these temperature issues exclusively with the 2.0L turbo? Or do 2.4L n/a base owners experience the same?

I have never seen our 2007 high mileage base Sky display concerning temp numbers discussed here, nor have I ever heard the radiator fan turn on. The car included no meaningful maintenance history when we bought it two years ago with 119,000 miles. I fear introducing air into the system when changing fluid. This past spring I instead slowly drained the coolant out the bottom of the radiator while adding new fluid in the reservoir. I plan to repeat this process next spring and again the following spring for a total of 3 times in what will likely be within a 2000 mile driving period (1000 miles per year).

Our base Sky was missing the under-the-radiator air scoop of which I installed a new one last spring. But I see no difference in operating temps with or without it.

I wonder if other base 2.4L n/a Sky owners have cooling issues. Am I just lucky?
You have a 2.4 and a manual so you run on the cooler side I would expect than others. The 2.0 appears to be predisposed to higher temps than the 2.4 because the added turbo heat. The same is true with autos vs manuals as the trans cooler in integrated into the cooling system. With that said the temps shouldn't vary more than 10-15 degrees between the 2.0 vs 2.4, manual vs auto.

As I stated earlier, from my experience with the 2.0, I was running consistently in the 205-210 range before I swapped my t-stat and WP. On a really hot day, 100+ and in traffic or in hills it would jump into the 220s. I never saw any temps higher than this except for when I did the coolant flush and I had air in the system. IIRC it jumped up to 250ish for a minute or so and then back down to 200 and stayed there. I also didn't have any heat, all of which are tell tale signs of an air pocket. After purging the air out with compressed air I never saw temps above the 220s. Now that I've swapped the t-stat and WP, I haven't had a chance to run it yet in the triple digits or extremely hard so I'm not sure what will be my new expected "high temp". I'm guessing since my normal running range cooled 10 or so degrees to the mid 190s I'm assuming my high range will now most likely be in the 210s which seems to line up with what most people experience as fairly normal for an auto RL.

I think for the most part people worry a little too much about their temps. It's most definitely something to keep an eye on as a driver, but the rules have changed for what is hot from 20-30+ years ago. There's a couple reasons I think this happens on the Kappas.
  1. The DIC reads out the temp just numerically instead of on a gauge giving a dial showing the driver a range of what is considered low, middle, high. My Silverado had a gauge right on the dash and that needle always pointed right in the middle at 210. I never once questioned if 210 was hot. My new Jeep shows these on a DIC but provides a digital gauge too.
  2. Everyone seems to be spooked with the WP failure and the known coolant issues. Our system is more problematic to purge air out of than other vehicles so I think everyone tends to keep an extra eye out of caution.
  3. The most important reason I believe, is a lot of our fellow owners are of an age where they remember anything above 160-180 as being hot. This was true for a long time and just like changing your oil every 3,000 miles has become habit. You can't teach an old dog new tricks. Now most manufacturers design their engines to run hotter and at higher pressures as they are actually more efficient and use less fuel this way. This is also why full synthetic oils are now the norm to handle the extra heat and pressures. I'm at an age where I recall my Dad saying things like change your oil every 3,000 miles and watch your temps, but I was not indoctrinated with it so I'm not particularly bothered by the number per se, but was more concerned with number 2. Now that I've tackled that problem I have found myself very rarely looking at the temp gauge anymore other than just out of curiosity.
 
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