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Eh. I plan on owning my GM Kappa for at least 3 years. But it's possible I'll own it for the next 20.

Today - we take it for granted critical car parts needed for a repair are available for us somewhere.

That could be through tascaparts, ebay, amazon.

Or even your local GM parts dealer. Mine is alliedautostores.com (20 miles from my place in San Ramon CA).

Or - for me the last resort since I always prefer ACDelco - AutoZone.

Already, some parts - like seat covers and fenders are in short supply.

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In California, in 2035, car dealerships will only be able to sell new electric cars.

I'm unclear on the implications for dealers regarding the used car market... (Does anyone know?)

But there may be be legislation to shut down the car parts business for autos powered by fossil fuels.

It isn't just electric-auto-manufacturers sour grapes.

In 2040 it may be that cars manufactured before 2020 will become desirable to own.

Cheaper. Serviceable by ODBCII. Faster. More reliable for long trips.

Repairable without OEM software. (In legalese the buzzwords are: "You have a right to repair your car.")

Now. We know any old car runs great so long as new parts are available. Even 30 years plus.

There may be a threshold - say - where 30% of cars are electric - where the price of oil goes way,way,way down.

Low oil prices will encourage lawmakers to accelerate the fossil-fuel phase out. Lawmakers are easily bribed by Tesla and other EV manufacturers.

Also, China manufactures many AC-Delco parts - and we can't count on those parts being available. Especially if China continues to ignore sanctions on North Korea.

Also - China makes more EVs than any other country. And sanctions could impact the EV market - leaving fossil fuel cars in demand.

All this has me recommending preventative maintenance. To members of this forum. To Kappa lovers. To everyone!!

So I plan on spending 120$ to replace a Intake & Exhaust Cam Position VVT Solenoid. So what I don't need it? So what there is no Service Engine Light justification?

Some on this forum sanctimoniously complained I was throwing money away. As if 120$ is a lot of money to waste. Is it???

Preventative maintenance keeps a car running like new - and preserves it for a future that isn't like today.
 

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These dinosaurs will be so slow comparatively in 15 years no one will want to buy them. I liken it to Model A's and T's today. You can pick them up for pennies, actually 50's cars are starting to go down in value. A 40 Ford coupe does not bring what it did 5 years ago. Only true collectors will have interest in this era of cars. We have 260HP on a good day, 1200HP electric cars will soon be on the street. If not already.

Love my car, wanted my Grand Son to have it. He is 10. He doesn't want it. He wants my FJ Cruiser. Kids

We all lived to get drivers license's when we were kids. Today the kids have no real interest in cars. They would rather be driven around and text their way to some place. World is a changing I guess. One of the guys that I ride bikes with has two daughters, one 18 ,and another 19. He was worried about getting them cars, paying for college, Both told him not to worry about a car, they had no need for one.

On the political front the way things are going, Chinese cars will be the norm anyway in another 10 years.
 

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@Emm , you make some good points, but I think you have some things wrong as well.

Parts are definitely going to be a problem, especially body and chassis parts. Our market is so small that it is unlikely that the aftermarket is going to make any more than it is now, and that isn't much. Powertrain parts are more likely to be available, but that is going to depend a lot on the way the market goes, and there really is no way to know what that is going to be.

Legislation is certainly the wild card, especially in places like California and New York. Some cities in Europe are already banning some ICE vehicles from certain areas, so the sale may not be restricted while use is.

ICE vehicles, especially at 20 years old, will not be cheaper, easier, faster or more reliable.

The price of oil will go down, unless it is being used to power the grid for all of those electric cars. That doesn't mean that the price of gasoline will go down, though. As less gasoline is used refineries will scale down or go off-line, and the price of gasoline will probably go up, even as gas stations close and the availability goes down.

Since the biggest EV manufacturers will likely be the current ICE vehicle manufacturers, there will be little incentive for them to bribe lawmakers to phase out ICEs. Once they are tooled to build EVs in volume it will actually be easier for them in just about every way.

China manufactures more EVs, but they are for their home market, and most do not meet US or EU safety standards.

Preventative maintenance is certainly important, but the cam solenoids are not part of it. My experience is that they do not wear out, they fail because of contamination. I replaced a set in a Sky that was not well maintained before I got it, and the failure was due to contamination. My other Sky has 105k miles on it with no sign of failure, and some have gone father than that without failure. $120 may not be a lot to waste, but it likely would be a waste.
 
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Just to jump in....I am a Quality Manager, so my POV is from that.....preventive maintenance is huge..in my shop we have spare parts on hand for nearly ALL PIECES of equipment...(I know its a bit different between a business and personal inventory etc).....while those solenoids are not failure prone (unless like John said contamination) if it gives you peace of mind to have 120 bux set in your garage in case....then its worth it. Just my POV.
For me, I plan on keeping my RL long term. Maybe I am a bit more romantic about things.....I remember that scene in the movie demolition man, when our hero finds that sweet, olds 442.....
LOL...I keep thinking when I die, thats what it will be like when they open my garage....
 

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Just to jump in....I am a Quality Manager, so my POV is from that.....preventive maintenance is huge..in my shop we have spare parts on hand for nearly ALL PIECES of equipment...(I know its a bit different between a business and personal inventory etc).....while those solenoids are not failure prone (unless like John said contamination) if it gives you peace of mind to have 120 bux set in your garage in case....then its worth it. Just my POV.
For me, I plan on keeping my RL long term. Maybe I am a bit more romantic about things.....I remember that scene in the movie demolition man, when our hero finds that sweet, olds 442.....
LOL...I keep thinking when I die, thats what it will be like when they open my garage....
I agree that having parts on hand is a good idea, and I have a reasonable stock myself, but that is not the same as replacing them pro-actively when there is no consistent data to support the value of predictive maintenance for that particular part.

We use a planning matrix to determine which spares should be stocked to keep our plant running. If a part is readily available, does not have a long lead time, and if its failure does not create a catastrophic stoppage, there is no value in stocking it.

We also use predictive maintenance techniques to pro-actively replace parts that are known to have a finite service life and that will create a loss if they fail unexpectedly. Parts that are readily available, easy to replace, that do not stop the equipment when they fail, and/or that fail unpredictably are not replaced until they actually fail, or until it is obvious that they are about to.
 

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After attending a "futures" seminar for aftermarket products I had to write a paper for my boss on what I had learned while there. Parts, gas and oil will never be "banned". They will become harder and harder to find as several exclusive parts (mainly body parts) for our cars have become (and cam solenoids aren't one of them...they are shared on many different cars as seen by their inexpensive price). Gas will become more increasingly expensive as less and less facilities produce it as John stated. I see the "right to repair" not going through as cars become electrified. Only the OE will be able to repair it. While others disagree, this is much like a piece of software you purchase. There is a thing called the EULA. It states that you cannot modify the code. The same goes for OE programs and parts. Unless they sell the rights to those parts, I'm a firm believer in EULA, copyrights and patents. Even though my car is tuned, I agree that people should not be allowed to mess with the ECM in cars/tractors/machinery. It is the OEs CODE! They wrote it, not you. It should fall under the same protection that software falls under. OEs are trying to do this now with "over the air software updates". It's done through wifi connections on your vehicle and they no longer need you to bring your car to the dealership to upload their software fixes on new cars. If they find the code has been modified, it flags your vehicle and your warranty is terminated.

Yes, times are changing. But our cars are like everything else. Can you find a back door for a 1966 Dodge Coronet Hemi 4 door? How about a grill for a 1954 Packard Panther? As you can see, it's the body parts that usually become hard to find, not the engine parts..and that's because engines are shared over many different models. The 2.4L and the 2.0L both still live on today in many of the new cars being produced. And many of the engine parts in the 2 cars I mentioned are still being produced. Quit worrying about non-maintenance items. Because when it comes right down to it, with your theory, anything that wears our or may cause an issue is a wear/maintenance item. And if that's the case, better buy an entire car to keep so you have spare parts....

**

NOTE: Tascaparts is no more then a mega dealer. He will have no more clout at getting parts for you then Joe's Auto Parts down the street has if the OE isn't producing them. You might get lucky and they may have a special part sitting somewhere in their dealership....

You might know the name Bob Tasca...a professional Funny Car driver. He owns the Tasca dealership enterprise on the east coast, left to him by his father. Much like Paul Menard (driver in NASCAR of the Menard's car and son of John Menard, founder of Menards) and Alexa DeJoria (NHRA Funny Car driver and father is John Paul DeJoria, founder of Paul Mitchell hair care products), both of whose father's owned big enterprise and left it to them....
 
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I agree that having parts on hand is a good idea, and I have a reasonable stock myself, but that is not the same as replacing them pro-actively when there is no consistent data to support the value of predictive maintenance for that particular part.

We use a planning matrix to determine which spares should be stocked to keep our plant running. If a part is readily available, does not have a long lead time, and if its failure does not create a catastrophic stoppage, there is no value in stocking it.

We also use predictive maintenance techniques to pro-actively replace parts that are known to have a finite service life and that will create a loss if they fail unexpectedly. Parts that are readily available, easy to replace, that do not stop the equipment when they fail, and/or that fail unpredictably are not replaced until they actually fail, or until it is obvious that they are about to.
We have a preventive maintenance plan..daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly and yearly....we also maintain our risk register on degrees of severity as well as probability of failure....in our industry we have found it beneficial to keep 90% of our parts on hand, when we use one, it is replaced.....it works for us....
 

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It would be interesting to own a large warehouse to store salvage Skys and Solstices in-whole for future value. But if that was done with the Pontiac Fiero it would have been a very poor investment. Time will tell if the Kappa will fall into the same category, or better.
 

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When I look back on all these Petrol Head worries, I remember the story of the old Kappa Driver who said on his deathbed that he had had a lot of trouble with his Ride, most of which had never happened.

W. Churchill
 

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However..... if you held onto and sold the last Fiero made..... it just went for I believe 90k. Less, original investment, storage, insurance and miscellaneous.
Never-mind 🤔 .....not as big of a profit as I first thought 💭
 

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Newsom's Executive Order does not affect cars up to the 2034 model year. So new ICE cars can be sold in 2035, so long as they are MY 2034 or older. Used cars MY 2034 and older are similarly unaffected.
Also keep in mind this is an EO, they next governor may rescind it, or the legislature may go another direction.

Also, remember that you will not be able to buy a new ICE vehicle out of state and register it in CA since it would not pass CARB requirements. It would have to be at least (6 months?) old and have 7,5000 miles on the odometer.
 

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08 Redline. RPM"s CAI, charge pipes, CAT delete & ECM Tune. diy tunnel brace. ProBeam.
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I agree that people should not be allowed to mess with the ECM in cars/tractors/machinery. It is the OEs CODE! They wrote it, not you. It should fall under the same protection that software falls under.
Whoa whoa whoa...
This is akin to saying they End User shouldn’t have the right to change his/her operating system on a computer from one to another.
The EULA protection you are talking about regards the End User not being allowed to copy the coding and sell it and/or distribute it as if it’s their own. There’s no protections for overwriting it because the End User isn’t doing anything with the coding except getting rid of it. Sure, there’s tuning devices that corrupt (for lack of a better term) the ECM to obtain certain performance parameters, but the End Users aren’t doing anything remotely illegal or immoral by making something they own into something they want it to be for themselves. They are, however, voiding any support agreements (like warranties, or potential law suits for accidents) per EULA.

Now, if I were to go and sell the trifecta tune that I once had, that would be a breach. The EULA protects the code owner from damages and piracy, not from deleting or changes by the End User for the End User’s (that‘s singular) personal use. It protects the code writer from the damages if the End User breaks something by changing the code. It also protects the code writer from having to support something when the End User changed the code.

Don’t misconstrue piracy, patents, or copy-write infringement from End User rights to modify for self use.
 

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I agree that people should not be allowed to mess with the ECM in cars/tractors/machinery. It is the OEs CODE! They wrote it, not you.
Not trying to put words in your mouth. But with that reasoning one could also say . . . .

I agree that people should not be allowed to mess with the color of their cars/tractors/machinery. It is the OEs paint! They painted it, not you.

:)
 

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I know a guy who's company does 3D scanning of anything you want to 3D print. It got me thinking that future printing should be readily available in composites and metals. I plan to have fabricated what I need. If I don't have a good original to build from, I'll come up with something (or hire someone to do so). Main thing will be to have someone permanently fix or bypass the passenger seat airbag sensor. LOL
 

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I know a guy who's company does 3D scanning of anything you want to 3D print. It got me thinking that future printing should be readily available in composites and metals. I plan to have fabricated what I need. If I don't have a good original to build from, I'll come up with something (or hire someone to do so). Main thing will be to have someone permanently fix or bypass the passenger seat airbag sensor. LOL
3D printing is improving rapidly, but there are still a lot of parts that cannot be printed, and t will be a long time before the technology is what we need.

The technology for replacing the Passenger Presence Sensor exists now, it is just waiting for the right market conditions.
 

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Sure, there’s tuning devices that corrupt (for lack of a better term) the ECM to obtain certain performance parameters, but the End Users aren’t doing anything remotely illegal or immoral by making something they own into something they want it to be for themselves. They are, however, voiding any support agreements (like warranties, or potential law suits for accidents) per EULA.
And this is where you're incorrect. If the "right to repair" doesn't pass, you do not own the vehicle. It is merely "leased to you for its usable life" by the manufacturer. Read the complete EULA (at least for computer programs) states that you cannot decomplile and change or modify the code. Thus tuning in vehicles would fall under this.

Not trying to put words in your mouth. But with that reasoning one could also say . . . .

I agree that people should not be allowed to mess with the color of their cars/tractors/machinery. It is the OEs paint! They painted it, not you.

:)
And this is what's in the suits right now. And it's getting more and more backing from suppliers as well as OEs of all sorts of equipment/vehicles. Now whether this all trickles down to cars, it's hard to say, but I know that GM is backing JD in these suits.
 

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Unlikely the price of oil will go down--if modern economies can successfully transition to renewable energy (assuming that they can survive the current economic devastation) and start consuming less oil, thne production will scale down with it and consumer prices will likely stay the same or increase. Once our friends at Exxon Mobil and Royal Dutch Shell stop forecasting profits from continued expansion, they're going to stop producing the stuff in such quantities.

At the same time, I imagine that as the drive to transition away from oil increases, governments (but sadly, probably not the US Government, if I'm honest) are going to increase the levies on the stuff to try to drive people towards electric vehicles.

As far as the Sky--if the people of Cuba can keep those 1950's American cars going for more than half a century without any access to OEM parts, I think if there's a will the community can keep the Sky on the road. 🍻
 

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I've been around long enough to see a pattern in my taste. As a kid in the early 70's, I wanted anything with dished chrome wheels, but never fulfilled the dream. My first toy was a 1983 Honda CX650 motorcycle, then Fiero-GTs, C5-Corvettes, now a Sky. Every change seems to have a 10 year run. I am about to start year #2 with our Sky.

I love the concept of the new mid-engine Corvette, but the actual car is a bit much. Maybe one day it will grow on me to make a change, but that is 9 years away. ;)
 
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