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If in the future you are ever going to be getting into the gas then get into the gas during the "break in" otherwise you will be saying hello to oil consumption.
 

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thats an interesting read...not sure if I agree with everything he says but I am sure I am not the first. Is this the way you break in your engines?
 

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After reading that page I am wondering what the max rmp should be for breakin on the 2.0 turbo...

Also with the motors coming with synthetic from the factory I am thinking that it wont matter if we put synthetic in at the first oil change :)
 

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Well, just spent the last hour Googling for any manner of a consensus for engine break-in. Predictably, there is none. I've attempted this many times before and it is always futile trying to find a consensus on car break-in.

Most major companies still advocate the 50's style "keep speeds down and don't lug it or rev it hard for 500 miles" mantra. Then you've got a bunch of companies advocating the "load it hard to seat the rings" philosophy. You've got your racers who say break it in on the dyno. You've got folks claiming the dyno is 5 times harder on the motor than drag racing. And you've got several sources including Mobile Oil saying, "modern cars are so well built, you don't need an extended break in anymore. Period".

Once again I call on the scholastic community to do a little experimental research in controlled settings to see what benefits or hazards, if any, result from the various brake-in procedures.

At this point I am in the "50's style change speeds but keep revs down but don't lug or accelerate too hard" camp. It's worked for me so far. But then again, if no break-in is really necessary, then everything all of us do has worked for all of us so far, only reinforcing our tendency to believe that whatever we are doing for break-in is the only right method for breaking in a new motor.:willy:

Is anybody a member of SAE? Every attempt to get information from them has lead to a paper I have to pay for to download. :brentil:
 

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Well, just spent the last hour Googling for any manner of a consensus for engine break-in. Predictably, there is none. I've attempted this many times before and it is always futile trying to find a consensus on car break-in.

Most major companies still advocate the 50's style "keep speeds down and don't lug it or rev it hard for 500 miles" mantra. Then you've got a bunch of companies advocating the "load it hard to seat the rings" philosophy. You've got your racers who say break it in on the dyno. You've got folks claiming the dyno is 5 times harder on the motor than drag racing. And you've got several sources including Mobile Oil saying, "modern cars are so well built, you don't need an extended break in anymore. Period".

Once again I call on the scholastic community to do a little experimental research in controlled settings to see what benefits or hazards, if any, result from the various brake-in procedures.

At this point I am in the "50's style change speeds but keep revs down but don't lug or accelerate too hard" camp. It's worked for me so far. But then again, if no break-in is really necessary, then everything all of us do has worked for all of us so far, only reinforcing our tendency to believe that whatever we are doing for break-in is the only right method for breaking in a new motor.:willy:

Is anybody a member of SAE? Every attempt to get information from them has lead to a paper I have to pay for to download. :brentil:
Jimbo,

The question of break-in always comes up when someone gets a new vehicle, I have never heard of any failures, I am sure they happen, but very rare. I break-in like I drive em. My son is SAE certified I'll ask him if he can get some info on this subject.:thumbs:

Cal
 

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I too have always drove it hard from day one. None of my cars burned oil like the cars the lady across the street. She gets a new car/van and drives so slowly and you can first smell the oil and after time can actually see the typical oil cloud trailing behind her.

I have used synthetic oil for years and change it every five thousand miles. My current car has over 214,000 miles and puts your head back as I stomp to pass. The engine is so clean folks think I just pressure cleaned it and the exhaust pipe is clean.

So yes I strongly agee with a hard break-in! :thumbs:
 

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Break in Period

I am not advocating anyone follow my path or deviate from the manufacturer's prescribed method of break in but I can tell you this. I grew up on a car lot my father owned and I have been a motorhead for over 40 years so I and my friends have seen, rebuilt, and broken in dozens of motors. Obviously this debate has raged for years but I can tell you that I have seen cars with the 50' style break in tend to use oil and cars which have been broken in like they're going to be driven tend not to use oil. I read the entire site that was referenced by Crimson Avenger http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
and that makes more sense, especially now that machining is more precise. And you certainly can't argue with the pictures showing the difference between the two types of break in. My point is this; if you take a car that has been softly broken in and driven for a while (years) and start romping on it, it will come apart and break down. If you break it in harder you can romp on it after the break in and it is more likely to stay together. It has a 100K mile warranty anyway. Please draw your own conclusions but I know how mine will broken in. I am not advocating driving straight to the local race track to see how many RPMs it will take or if you can make it come apart but I'm going to have a pretty good idea what my Redline is made of about a mile from the dealership when I can get out in the country on some straight open road. Good luck to all and may your wait be rewarded with a ride that exceeds expectations when your Sky is in your driveway!
 

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I am not advocating anyone follow my path or deviate from the manufacturer's prescribed method of break in but I can tell you this. I grew up on a car lot my father owned and I have been a motorhead for over 40 years so I and my friends have seen, rebuilt, and broken in dozens of motors. Obviously this debate has raged for years but I can tell you that I have seen cars with the 50' style break in tend to use oil and cars which have been broken in like they're going to be driven tend not to use oil. I read the entire site that was referenced by Crimson Avenger http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
and that makes more sense, especially now that machining is more precise. And you certainly can't argue with the pictures showing the difference between the two types of break in. My point is this; if you take a car that has been softly broken in and driven for a while (years) and start romping on it, it will come apart and break down. If you break it in harder you can romp on it after the break in and it is more likely to stay together. It has a 100K mile warranty anyway. Please draw your own conclusions but I know how mine will broken in. I am not advocating driving straight to the local race track to see how many RPMs it will take or if you can make it come apart but I'm going to have a pretty good idea what my Redline is made of about a mile from the dealership when I can get out in the country on some straight open road. Good luck to all and may your wait be rewarded with a ride that exceeds expectations when your Sky is in your driveway!
:agree: :agree:
Except I also tend to do it in short runs, and try to never let the engine fully warm up in the first couple 100 miles, this may be overkill now days with synthetic oil, in the old days I always worried about gumming the oil. :thumbs:
 

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break in

You shouldnt rage on a brand new motor. Give it a few hundred for the rings to seat properly. If the cylinders glaze early, oil consumption will increase,, usually. Also, never use synthetic immediately. I would start with that after the first oil change. I wouldnt use anything but synthetic on a turbo motor.

Does the redline come with synth from the factory??
 

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You shouldnt rage on a brand new motor. Give it a few hundred for the rings to seat properly. If the cylinders glaze early, oil consumption will increase,, usually. Also, never use synthetic immediately. I would start with that after the first oil change. I wouldnt use anything but synthetic on a turbo motor.

Does the redline come with synth from the factory??
No it is coming with regular oil.
 

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I'm in agreement that you should drive it like you do everyday. I do not mean putting your foot through the throttle all day long, but you should extend the rpm range all the way from time to time. Why, because as you drive in the higher rpm range, the pistons will extend higher into the cylinde wall top. Laymans term - Its the spinning object idea that the force increases outward with centrifical force. You prevent the cylinder walls from building up a ridge at the end of the stroke during breakin and if later on you start hammering on the engine, the rings actually hit the ridge harder with increased rpms. I am an engineer and a gearhead for 30 years now and have seen it all. And as a final note the factory engines do have a mch better tolerence machining than in the past, but the engines that have been built for years by the specialty shops have always been done well.
 

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You shouldnt rage on a brand new motor. Give it a few hundred for the rings to seat properly. If the cylinders glaze early, oil consumption will increase,, usually. Also, never use synthetic immediately. I would start with that after the first oil change. I wouldnt use anything but synthetic on a turbo motor.

Does the redline come with synth from the factory??
Considering the rings seat in about the first 30 minutes of the engine running it will be fine.
 

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here"s what i think works

1st if possiple perform heat cycles 4 to 6 in the early stages of running the engine.

increase the time the motor heat and cools. j e pistons a high perfomance company that manufacturs high flow heads and forged pistons for cars and motorcycles has explain
to us that in the early stages of running a new motor the piston will actually explode and expain in the early stages and start to form to the cyclinder wall. thats why many engine builders believe in heat cycles letting the metals heat and cool down.

so i would increase the time running as the cycles add up say

1 5 min 2 10 min etc

might be hard to do but if your not in a hurry its possible

so i would stay off the highway at first and short runs as many as possible

no light thottle at one set speed let the motorwork

and after that i would just increase the rpm range as the miles build

so my system would be like this

0 to 50 miles heat cycles

50 to 250 miles stay on secondary roads let the motor work no light thottle at one set speed / off the highway if possible but not in traffic either which would heat the motor more let the motor get air and work. cool weather is even better

250 to 500 miles increase the rpm range but don t get crazy you will feel whats right i would have to own the car to kind of know the range of the powerband but you can feel it if you take your time

after 500 to 1000 miles i would change the 1st oil closer to the 500 mark and only then would i increase the pulls on the r

but thats me and it might sound crazy to some of you

but try to use some of this things and you should be fine

good luck and happy motoring !
 

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hello

anyways dont get me wrong you could start this car drive to cailfornia from new jersey and i am sure you would not hurt anything

this would just be my system of break in

also dont lug the motor which means to high a gear for the speed you are going keep it crisp if you know what i mean

good luck

also i believe new motors are run in a engine room at the factory to check for balance and stuff before they are installed. so maybe heat cycles are performed at this time im just not sure how much time they would spend.

peace out mark aka hayabusa
 

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Your car being prep by the service dept for 5 or 10 mins of a test drive and then shut off theres your 1st heat cycles right there

And the one or ones in the engine room when they run the motor but im not sure if they just run the motor once or not maybe at all__ somebody would works at the factory could tell us more maybe

I believe a complete cool dowm is the best but i understand not many people can do this.

But most of you will find out that after one week of owning the car and the car sits over night and has a complete cool down you will start to feel the motor getting stronger.

later mark
 
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