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I will be putting my Sky away for the winter (hopefully not too soon), and am wondering if there are certain things I should do. I don't know if I should put her away with a full tank of gas, or almost empty. ( I don't want her to start out in the spring with stale gas). Also, is it a good idea to start the car once a week or so? Should I move her, so she's not sitting on the same part of the tires? Take the battery out? I'm sure someone here has all the answers, plus answers to questions I don't even know to ask. That's what's so great about this forum.
 

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Well...I've never stored a car before...but I do store my motorcycle in the winter, so I would imagine the concept is roughly the same. I put fuel stabilizer (Stabil) in a full gas tank and then I hook up a battery tender to my bike's battery. Although, with the Sky's battery being in a rather hard to reach place...that may not be possible...I'm not really sure. Maybe someone else knows for sure. I also give my bike a good washing and wax before winter storage and then I cover it up with a breathable dust cover. I would think those would also apply to storing your Sky. I was always told not to start my bike over winter storage because it causes condensation to build up inside the motor and the exhaust and also because starting a bike puts the biggest drain on the battery...so I never start up my bike until I'm ready to bring it out in the spring for a ride. But I'm not sure if that part would apply to cars.
 

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This is from a friend who has been an Auto Mechanic and New Car Tech for many years.
How long are you going to store the car?
If it is only 30-40 days -- really nothing to worry about
However if it is going to sit for more than 40 days -- you should run it (at least driving would be better) but make sure all operating temps are full up. So 5-10 minutes is not enough.
20-30 min is more like it. Yes you can idle a car for 30 min with no real problems.
However if you can drive it for at least 15 min -- please do.

Gas levels don't matter that much but closer to full than empty

Oil - There are two camps -- keep the oil that is in there and change after winter or -- change before storage. He leans toward neither - especially if you are less than 50% into the change (say 75% or more oil life on the DIC - you should change at 20% according to Owner Manual and OnStar). Because you should change it right after storage. If the oil is in decent shape it will be fine for the few runs you will do over the winter. However any condensation etc that might gather should be changed out come spring, so putting brand new oil in there at the start -- is kind of a waste.
 

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This is from a friend who has been an Auto Mechanic and New Car Tech for many years.
How long are you going to store the car?
If it is only 30-40 days -- really nothing to worry about
However if it is going to sit for more than 40 days -- you should run it (at least driving would be better) but make sure all operating temps are full up. So 5-10 minutes is not enough.
20-30 min is more like it. Yes you can idle a car for 30 min with no real problems.
However if you can drive it for at least 15 min -- please do.

Gas levels don't matter that much but closer to full than empty

Oil - There are two camps -- keep the oil that is in there and change after winter or -- change before storage. He leans toward neither - especially if you are less than 50% into the change (say 75% or more oil life on the DIC - you should change at 20% according to Owner Manual and OnStar). Because you should change it right after storage. If the oil is in decent shape it will be fine for the few runs you will do over the winter. However any condensation etc that might gather should be changed out come spring, so putting brand new oil in there at the start -- is kind of a waste.


:agree: :agree: :agree:

You really don't have to to anything special but start it once in a while. I think my husband starts it every few weeks. And we leave a full tank of gas.
 

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FYI.......................My husband stores our 1992, gas level is not an issue, but he does have a battery charger attached to the vehicle, and there are several stacks of carpet underneath the tires so they don't flatten in one are. Also he does watch the level of fluids, and still maintains a clear oil stick.......this car is babied more than me :eek: ..........waaa......:D
 

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Tyre pressure

Best is to lift the car so that you havn't any load on the tyres.
If not possible raise tyre pressure 10 to 15 psi, to get no "flat stands" (out of round).
 

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I plan to take the car out whenever (say 1/2 hr ride) the roads are saltless... so I'll just keep an eye on the tires.
 

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I plan to take the car out whenever (say 1/2 hr ride) the roads are saltless... so I'll just keep an eye on the tires.
To raise tyre pressure only is needed if you don't use the car for 6 month or so.
In your case running the car once a month you allways stand in a new position after driving, but to put 3 to 5 more psi would be amiss.
 

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I have always lived in Illinois (snow and salt in winter), I have never really done anything special for winter storage, but I have always driven any summer car/trucks at least once a month during the winter (Just wait for a day when he roads are clear and dry and take a 15 min drive) and then changed the oil in the spring.

While I have done this very informally (I never worried if it went 6 vs 4 weeks) the last truck I had that I drove this way is 11 years old and has 200,000+ miles on it and still going strong. :thumbs:

Opps I almost forgot I always wash after any winter drives :)
 

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My husband and I have the best idea!
We are in sunny AZ just let us watch your car for the winter! We will keep it real clean and.... Ok OK but it was worth a try!
 

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I have always lived in Illinois (snow and salt in winter), I have never really done anything special for winter storage, but I have always driven any summer car/trucks at least once a month during the winter (Just wait for a day when he roads are clear and dry and take a 15 min drive) and then changed the oil in the spring.

While I have done this very informally (I never worried if it went 6 vs 4 weeks) the last truck I had that I drove this way is 11 years old and has 200,000+ miles on it and still going strong. :thumbs:

Opps I almost forgot I always wash after any winter drives :)
I agree. No matter where you live in the US there are always a few clear days/roads where you can give it a spin. That's what I do.
 

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Being right outside Chicago -- that's my plan... There are always dry - saltless days...:thumbs:
 

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My husband and I have the best idea!
We are in sunny AZ just let us watch your car for the winter! We will keep it real clean and.... Ok OK but it was worth a try!
A very generous offer. Makes me proud to be an Arizonian!!
 

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ahh southern living

I am born and raised in the South so I am amazed at all this talk of winter storage......... fascinating really........you guys deserve to make more money up north just for putting up with the weather!:thumbs: My baby will miss a couple of days tops due to icy roads. More winter weather than Arizona but still way less than Akron. :) So on this note I also humbly volunteer my services as winter driver for anybody needing it. Just leave your cars with the good folks of Arkansas and Arizona We will take good care of them for ya!!:jester: Anybody from Alabama wanna volunteer :D
 

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I do , I do an I promise the dogs won't drive them....Skip..:D
 

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Storage in Minnesota winters

Over the years I've read & tried everything re: storage of bikes & cars, settling on the easiest because it's seemed to work well. Full tank of fuel, Stabil in the tank, a bottle of Heet or similar isopropyl alcohol, and either hook up the Battery Tender or remove the battery altogether. Having tried both ways, I now resist the temptation to start it until Spring. This routine has never let me down and is the easiest.

To each their own, but I never drive on roads that have been salted over winter until there have been at least several good Spring thunderstorms. That dried powdered salt gets everywhere. I know people get a kick out of driving on those clear, dry winter days, but the salt's still there and getting sprayed all over the vehicle. I'll be patient and avoid the certain corrosion.

But hey, to each their own and more power to ya!
 

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They said Californie is the place you ought to be!
But the SKY can't haul no luggage, so you're stuck by Lake Erie...
 

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My husband and I have the best idea!
We are in sunny AZ just let us watch your car for the winter! We will keep it real clean and.... Ok OK but it was worth a try!
As long as my car would be in your driveway -- I'd be in your house... :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
You have all been very helpful. I have heard several mentions of a "battery tender". Is this different than a charger? I've never heard of it.
 

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You have all been very helpful. I have heard several mentions of a "battery tender". Is this different than a charger? I've never heard of it.
Those of us who were/are motorcyclists use them in the way. They are, in effect, a very slow trickle charger. Most regular battery chargers will go to trickle when your battery is charged -- but that rate still could overheat/overcharge/damage a battery if left on too long. A Battery tender will charge only as needed and pretty much shut off when not needed.:thumbs:
 
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