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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Video games not only teach children creativity, problem-solving skills, leadership, but also inspire learning about culture and history.
Parents often focus on the risks and dangers rather than the potential benefits that video games bring. In any case, parents still have to admit games are part of the modern youth's age.
If you know how to find a suitable video game for your child, it can become a powerful tool to help children develop life skills. They can also help parents become more engaged with their children, help educators find new ways to support teaching, and help game makers create highly educational games.
 

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although there are downsides, I also believe that there also benefits. It can help them build skills and make social connections, they become very creative
 

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Kids should do things they will not do as adult. So they should go out, explore the world, climb a tree, build a hut . . . . . video games are no good, but they are here to stay
All depends. I use to be big into flight simulators. Hundreds if not thousands of hours in them. I went for a check out ride and was told to make some turns. I put the plane into a bank, gave it a little up elevator and watched the rate of climb indicator to ensure I wasn't climbing or falling, glanced at the slip indicator and put in a little rudder to rotate the aircraft and then, after completing the turn, leveled her back out. The pilot asked me how many times I had flown before.

"None, this is my first time..." I told him. He was shocked and said that if I was already making nice level turns like this I'd solo in no time if I decided to take lessons. He said most first timers were sliding all over the sky. Then I mentioned the flight sims.

Now I wasn't just playing Microsoft Flight Simulator (which is outstanding if you ever want to fly in the real world) but mostly I was playing combat flight sims...F-19 (and later F-117 after it was declassified) Stealth Fighter, F-15 Strike Eagle, A-10 Warthog, Fighting Falcon 4.0, Apache, Secret Weapons of the Luftwaffe, B-17 Flying Fortress, Battle of Britain, Flight Sim Pacific, Flight Sim Europe, and a few others I'm probably forgetting...but the flight dynamics were always based on real world physics. Even when the simulation engine was not completely realistic, the basic flight operations were relatable to the real world.

Today professional race car drivers use racing simulations to prepare for upcoming races because the physics engines and track mapping has gotten so good that the experience is helpful when they get on track in the real world. Online racers have transitioned over to real time racing and performed very well right off the bat. So really, it depends on what kind of games you're talking about.
 

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........... So really, it depends on what kind of games you're talking about.
And what your goal is. If you want to learn do do something, video game simulation can be a big help. If you want a healthy sociable child, it probably won't be.
 

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but the flight dynamics were always based on real world physics. Even when the simulation engine was not completely realistic, the basic flight operations were relatable to the real world.
I used similar logic with my wife when she caught me watching porn on the computer. I don't think she believed me!
 

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And what your goal is. If you want to learn do do something, video game simulation can be a big help. If you want a healthy sociable child, it probably won't be.
I think our concept of "sociable" is becoming more and more outdated every day. Social media and the access to all forms of digital media is transforming what it is to be social. Activities that were once done face to face (like old school Dungeons and Dragons) can now be done online and still achieve a similar level of social interaction with people from all different areas of the world which can greatly expand a child's exposure to other cultures and experiences beyond their local neighborhood. As with anything else, having these experiences in the proper proportion is key and too much of anything is never healthy.

I used similar logic with my wife when she caught me watching porn on the computer. I don't think she believed me!
Maybe you didn't adequately demonstrate the benefit of your education, like @Robotech did while flying. The proof is in the ... something.
Yea, what John said. LOL
 

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Being able to walk down the street while staring into your phone, drawing crazy ears on your grand father, and texting as you drive, are not social skills, that are attributed to their social network.

Having 9 year olds discussing the capacity and use of AR 15's are not skills that need to be developed. Having children have to live up to their supposed peers in real time is not needed. Continuous bulling complaints used to be handled by kicking someone's ass, not killing your self.

Most kids in this country can not tell time, nor can they write. Have no idea of our history or any geographic area. My 11 year old grand daughter, who is considered gifted, could not tell me the Capitol of California, or any other state for that matter.

Yea it is all wonderful.
 

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They are not social skills in your social arena, but they are in theirs. As an adolescent we had numerous talks over M-16s and AK-47s regarding their use, pros and cons in real world scenarios. Nevermind fighters, tanks, APCs and submarines. Having kids live up to their peers is not needed, but has always been an issue and bullying results in any number of anti social behaviors, fighting only being one of them...the bullied becoming the bully is another. Social media has just expanded the opportunities and anonymity of the bullying.

As a freshman in High School I was correcting the questions on my history teacher's test on WWII...not the students' answers, the questions themselves because he had some wrong. As a senior we had a teacher come into our classroom exasperated because, on a geography quiz, he had a number of students thing the Gulf of California was the Persian Gulf, that each state was it's own country, and at least one that not only thought California was its own country separate from the rest of the US...but was also an island. Never mind the state capitals. This is over 30 years ago before video games were not nearly as ingrained into the fabric of society as they are today. So I'm not seeing how "video games" and "social media" are to blame for any of this. Have they changed the way these issues present? Oh you betcha...but these conditions have been around long before smartphones and Facebook.

Can you tell time with a sun dial or by looking at the position of the sun during the day? I actually bet you can...because I know you... but how often do you use that skill today? Can you do math with an abacus? Have a quill pen and write in cursive? Navigate with a sextant? Technology changes our skill sets...for better or for worse. Kids today may not write well with a pen and paper, but they can communicate more, and with anyone around the world, with a few button presses and a couple seconds. Just because they cannot communicate putting pen to paper doesn't mean they can't communicate equally effectively. Society has changed where being able to write and telling time with a traditional clock has become less critical. It just isn't as important as it once was.

I don't like all of it...I wish some of it wouldn't change. I think kids are losing out on learning some of these skills, the history of our nation...of the world, and heaven forbid something happens where they lose this tech because the digital tools they lean so heavily on have never been more fragile than the tools of the past...but saying they are somehow less for it...maybe that's only because we apply our definition of social to it and, just like our parents before us who thought the same of our Rock and Roll, our movies, or our "useless hobbies", we are viewing them the same way and maybe, just maybe, they'll do just fine.

BTW, I have a history degree. I'm a programmer. How'd I wind up here?

Video Games....
 

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I was a gamer for many years, and realized it was wasting my life, causing problems with my family. Actually played Call of Duty for a long time until it got so unrealistic and on line, so racist vocally. I quit. I never felt I gained anything from it, other than entertainment, and learned the N word was so popular, with not only white people but young Black people. It is a cesspool as far as I am concerned

I witness my grandchildren living on the their computers. I drive down streets with young families, not a single kid outside riding a bicycle, playing a game, doing anything physical. I see schools with lines of cars full of mom's waiting to pick up their kids. They could not possibly walk a half mile, as the boogie man would be sure to get them. Living in fear of real life. I see soccer games being played on the weekends where everyone wins, no scores, everyone gets a trophy.

You can have your new world, I am glad my time is getting short.
 

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Video games are fantastic. I got into coding as a young kid because my dad did basic IT stuff but brought home floppy disks with hacked apogee games on them. I learned how to launch them on DOS. I later spent a lot of time in Diablo and Starcraft, which emphasize problem solving and teamwork. Fast forward 20-30 years I am still doing much of the same on a much larger scale (obviously outside of gaming). Video games dig into creative troubleshooting which is a great life skill.
 

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There are more and more studies that are recognizing the DOWNSIDE of much digital media in our lives...young and old.
There are particularly harmful for children under 8 yrs old. Up til then, their brains are learning how to LEARN and wire appropriately.
The old pencil and paper method taught analytical methods and problem solving skill. Electronics teach more how to be REACTIVE.

Another side effect to electronics is the brain stimulation that makes dopamine. Very addictive and the brain likes it.
The very same that causes people to be addicticted to anything else, cigs, booze, porn, shoplifting, etc
Excess dopamine in the brain eventually causes overload, symptoms are depression, irritability, rage, lethargy, etc.
Walk up to you child/teenager/spouse and ask them to give you their phone while they are engaged in texting, social media, games.
You will see a side of them that proves my point.

As hard as it might be, under 8 yr olds should not be exposed to more that 1 hr of electronics a day(seriously)
Us older folks must self evaluate how "addicted" we actually are as well and find a moderation point.
S Korea has the most advanced internet system and technology in the hands of the people.
There are actually 300+ digital "detox" centers for people to shake the electronics addiction "monkey on their back".

I work in the schools. The rising quantity of "social misfits" in the primary and elementary schools is alarming. They need 1 and 2 teachers aides
in EVERY classroom just to help keep kids focused and to help the ones that are in LA LA LAND most of the time.
Their attention span is so short and their sudden outbursts with no filtering is alarming.

As parents and grandparents take the time, as posted above, to go OUT and do things ,"explore the world, climb a tree, build a hut/treehouse ," fishing, hiking, etc
THESE are the future adults that will be running businesses and out Country...
 
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