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The R/L being my first adventure into turbos, was wondering if the turbo requires a break in period as does the motor. After all it does contains bearings & seals, and will the same break in procedure apply to the R/L as the base SKY?:confused:
 

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Ernest I have never seen a SEAL in a turbo, some of them think they are turbo charged but there not......seal9:lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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I have a 2003 95 SAAB which has a turbo charged engine. There were no special requirements for break-in on it.
 

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richmcc said:
::da dum dum:: :lol:
There's no shot shot like a rim shot!!!

Schtick is the best. nyuck nyuck nyuck!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :lol: :rolleyes:
 

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I'd follow the same guidelines as the normal car. The only extra thing I would add is if you've just run the car kinda hard give it a minute at idle speeds just sitting there before shutting it off. Most modern cars don't have to worry about oil caking and overheating turbos like older cars but it's best to play it safe.
 

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brentil said:
I'd follow the same guidelines as the normal car. The only extra thing I would add is if you've just run the car kinda hard give it a minute at idle speeds just sitting there before shutting it off. Most modern cars don't have to worry about oil caking and overheating turbos like older cars but it's best to play it safe.
:agree:
That's the same we run the older Opel Turbo engines (C20LET,Z20LET...).
No special break in, no problems in hard high load driving because the oil is hold on temperature by the oil cooler.
When you shut off the engine, the oil is not in circulation any longer and the small volume of oil captured in the turbo can heat up extremly.
By rotating some minutes at idle speed the turbo can cool down by the flowing oil and water.
If you drive normal load just shut off the engine as usual.

The utilized motor oil should be a high quality type not to low in viscosity. In Germany many Turbo drivers use 5W/50 or 10W/60 Synthetic.
 

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I have had plenty of turbo cars and the best thing to do is let the seals set into place. I say wait until the first oil change befor you beat the hell out of it.
 

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brentil said:
I'd follow the same guidelines as the normal car. The only extra thing I would add is if you've just run the car kinda hard give it a minute at idle speeds just sitting there before shutting it off. Most modern cars don't have to worry about oil caking and overheating turbos like older cars but it's best to play it safe.
Brentil,

Good thought, because this is what I had to do with the water cooled turbo in my MR2, but didn't it say somewhere that this was an air-cooled turbo? Just wondering....I have never had a air-cooled turbo(as opposed to water-cooled) before...
 

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Nemesis said:
Brentil,

Good thought, because this is what I had to do with the water cooled turbo in my MR2, but didn't it say somewhere that this was an air-cooled turbo? Just wondering....I have never had a air-cooled turbo(as opposed to water-cooled) before...
I thought that the air cooled was referring to the how the air was cooled before it was forced into the intake manifold. If you look at pictures you will see that the air passes through a radiator like device that allows the rushing air to cool it.

The turbo itself is cooled by oil.
 

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C20LET_50 said:
The utilized motor oil should be a high quality type not to low in viscosity. In Germany many Turbo drivers use 5W/50 or 10W/60 Synthetic.
The GXP/RL/Opel GT will all come with Mobile 1 Synthetic 5w30 I believe. I'm not positive on the 5w30 part (that's what the base cars use) but I know for sure it is Mobile 1 Synthetic. We also have an oil cooler attached to the block on the base car (compared to no cooler on the 2.2L ECOTECs) and I believe an enhanced cooler on the Turbocharged cars to help even more.
 

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Nemesis said:
Brentil,

Good thought, because this is what I had to do with the water cooled turbo in my MR2, but didn't it say somewhere that this was an air-cooled turbo? Just wondering....I have never had a air-cooled turbo(as opposed to water-cooled) before...
As richmcc pointed out the air-to-air is the technology used to cool the compressed air as it enters the engine. The Turbocharger itself has an oil line that runs to the oil pan and uses your engines normal oil to cool itself during operation. On older cars with older systems you could get what is called oil caking. C20LET_50 touched on this some. The Turbocharger would get extremely hot and oil would pool in it when the motor was stopped and would in essence bake the oil since it was no longer circulating to keep it cooler. You'll hear some people refer to 'Turbo Timers' which are devices you connect to your car that keep the engine running for an amount of time after you've shut the engine off to keep the oil circulating while the Turbocharger cools down. I'm pretty sure advances in oil cooling, oils themselves, Turbochargers, and this being an OE application of this type of system we really wont have a problem with this, but like I said you're better off playing it safe then sorry.
 

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richmcc said:
I thought that the air cooled was referring to the how the air was cooled before it was forced into the intake manifold. If you look at pictures you will see that the air passes through a radiator like device that allows the rushing air to cool it.

The turbo itself is cooled by oil.

Different terminology them I am used to. Usually this is just referred to "intercooled", no air-cooled. Air-cooled makes me think of the porsche and beetle engines that were air-cooled with no liquid coolant.
 
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