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I was getting ready to do the DDMWorks GT2871 turbo upgrade but they're no longer offering it. Just wondering about options without needing to take out a second mortgage. I currently have a 2008 Redline, GM Performance tune, GM cold air intake, Trifecta tune, Solo Performance Ultra High Flow Cat, Solo Performance Mach Shorty Exhaust.

Anyone?
 

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I went thru RPM Motorsports. I did all of the work and did the tune remotely. Very nice upgrade with plenty of power. My 2009 Ruby Redline is now in the Goldie-locks zone. Not so much power you can’t go for nice Sunday drive with your special someone, yet enough power to pin you to the seat and surprise the Mustangs and Camaros ?
 

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After a bunch of deliberation last month I ended up going with the RPM "Big Wheel" K04 upgrade. As far as I know there isn't any other option that is dual scroll, and single-scroll introduces more turbo lag, which I definitely did not want. And the power band is still somewhat flat (though not as much so as stock). I wasn't as much interested in a big number in a short RPM range with lag. So that, Solo high flow cat, and Solo Street Race exhaust. I also ordered the DDM clutch and aluminum flywheel package. I'm planning to have Wester's do the tune.

None of it is installed yet though; the exhaust and cat (which I'm going to do) showed up last week. The clutch and turbo I'm going to have my ASE certified mechanic buddy do, when they arrive.

This should get the car to the 350-375 HP range, which is both a big jump from the GMPP tune and still under the 400 number where stock engine internals reportedly need to be addressed.
 

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Wise choice.
 

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Curious what the difference is between the Performance Autowerks big wheel turbo and the RPM Motorsports big wheel turbo.
 

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Now you are just pun-ishing me!

Clearly an un-savory character I shall not offer you any further encourage-mint!!
 

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RPM Stage 2

Does anyone know of a video showing the replacement of the fuel injectors for the Stage 2 Tune? The Mike Martin Youtube series shows the Part 1 of the Stage 2 but not the part where he replaces the fuel injectors. I am comfortable with general mechanics but not sure how difficult this will be. Also, it seems like there is a bit of back and forth RPM to get the tune figured out. How difficult is the process overall?
 

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Does anyone know of a video showing the replacement of the fuel injectors for the Stage 2 Tune? The Mike Martin Youtube series shows the Part 1 of the Stage 2 but not the part where he replaces the fuel injectors. I am comfortable with general mechanics but not sure how difficult this will be. Also, it seems like there is a bit of back and forth RPM to get the tune figured out. How difficult is the process overall?
Why don't you contact RPM instead of asking third parties? If they can't explain it to you, you probably shouldn't be using them.
 

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Does anyone know of a video showing the replacement of the fuel injectors for the Stage 2 Tune? The Mike Martin Youtube series shows the Part 1 of the Stage 2 but not the part where he replaces the fuel injectors. I am comfortable with general mechanics but not sure how difficult this will be. Also, it seems like there is a bit of back and forth RPM to get the tune figured out. How difficult is the process overall?
Are you a base model or Redline?

Replacing fuel injectors in the 2.4 is pretty easy. You do need a GM fuel line removal tool (available at any autoparts store) and a few simple tools.

You first depresurize the rail using the schrader (SP?) valve on the rail. This is the nipple that looks like it has a tire valve stem cap on it. This valve works just like a tire stem valve. You take off the cap and push in the stem in the center of the valve with something like a small screwdriver (wear eye protection). Once depresurized, un-plug all four injectors from the harness. They are a two part plug. The first part is a "lock" you have to pull out. It only comes out a little and they don't come out all the way. Once they are unlocked, you then push down on the tab the lock "locks" and pull on the plug. They should come off fairly easy. Now, using the fuel rail tool, disconnect the factory fuel line from the rail. This fitting does have a secure lock on it too but that just comes off by hand. You then have two 10mm bolts that hold the rail to the head. Remove these.

With all this off, the rail with the injectors attached will pull out of the head with a little effort. Be careful though as the injectors actually go into what GM calls injector insulators. These are big plastic pieces with an o-ring on the outside of them. Sometimes they come out with the injectors, sometimes they don't. DON'T lose these! With the rail out, the injectors are held into the rail with some small clips you need to remove. These can be pulled off with a pair of needle nose pliers. Keep these too and note how they go on and their orientation. With those off, the injetors just pull out of the rail.

Reinstallation is the reverse of above but you want to be sure the orings on both ends of the injectors are well lubed before istalling them in the rail or into the insulators. If you had insulators come out. Lube up their oring and reinstall them in the head before reinstalling the rail with the injectors.

Replacing the injectors for the 2.0 turbo car is a different story and, from what I've heard, not as easy. Replacing port injectors isn't hard and isn't propritary to one aftermarket company.
 

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Thanks Robotech - very helpful (unlike wspohn's).
 

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After a bunch of deliberation last month I ended up going with the RPM "Big Wheel" K04 upgrade. As far as I know there isn't any other option that is dual scroll, and single-scroll introduces more turbo lag, which I definitely did not want. And the power band is still somewhat flat (though not as much so as stock). I wasn't as much interested in a big number in a short RPM range with lag. So that, Solo high flow cat, and Solo Street Race exhaust. I also ordered the DDM clutch and aluminum flywheel package. I'm planning to have Wester's do the tune.

None of it is installed yet though; the exhaust and cat (which I'm going to do) showed up last week. The clutch and turbo I'm going to have my ASE certified mechanic buddy do, when they arrive.

This should get the car to the 350-375 HP range, which is both a big jump from the GMPP tune and still under the 400 number where stock engine internals reportedly need to be addressed.
At the engine maybe, If you put your car on a dyno afterwards, expect around 325 wheel HP.

You don't need a new clutch for this power output and let me tell you, and JohnnyGXP can back me up on this, as well as some others,
The DDM CLUTCH SUCKS!!
You will hate your car every time you have to start it from a dead stop in first gear.

Stick with your stock clutch. Trust someone who has been there done that.
Don't consider replacing your clutch until you blow it, and even then, replace it with a stock one.
 

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The DDM CLUTCH SUCKS!!
You will hate your car every time you have to start it from a dead stop in first gear.
I installed the DDM clutch when I replaced my engine last winter. It is almost an on/off switch when first installed. I feel like the clutch has an extremely long break in period (or maybe learning curve). After about 5,000 miles it gets alot easier (or maybe you just GIT GUD). If all you do is drive around town and cruise in the car I say skip the clutch and just stick with stock. But if you drive aggressively on twisty roads then you will like it. It makes rev match down shifting alot smoother and easier. Also the RPM hang on up shifts is significantly reduced. Those two factors were enough for me to keep the clutch and just deal with it on my daily commute. Also NVH is increased as well. I have about 14,000 miles of driving on the setup so far.
 

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Stick with your stock clutch. Trust someone who has been there done that.
Don't consider replacing your clutch until you blow it, and even then, replace it with a stock one.
I installed the DDM clutch when I replaced my engine last winter. It is almost an on/off switch when first installed. I feel like the clutch has an extremely long break in period (or maybe learning curve). After about 5,000 miles it gets alot easier (or maybe you just GIT GUD). If all you do is drive around town and cruise in the car I say skip the clutch and just stick with stock. But if you drive aggressively on twisty roads then you will like it. It makes rev match down shifting alot smoother and easier. Also the RPM hang on up shifts is significantly reduced. Those two factors were enough for me to keep the clutch and just deal with it on my daily commute. Also NVH is increased as well. I have about 14,000 miles of driving on the setup so far.
I kind of side with KappaTarbo on this one. I replaced my clutch with a Spec Stage 3+ and the stock flywheel. if you go this kind of route, get an adjustible master cylinder too as I found the release point of the pedal needed to be adjusted when using that combination.

However, after the 500-1000 mile break in, I bet most folks wouldn't be able to tell if my clutch is stock or not. I'm at 266 whp (about 320 flywheel) and am on a 2.4 with the Redline turbo strapped to it. My power levels will be going up and I'm switching to the Spec flywheel to handle where I'm going power wise...or rather hope to.

I would agree though that for the power level you'll be at, the stock clutch will probably work just fine for daily driving. If you find it starts slipping, you may want to consider upgrading to something else when you replace it.
 

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If you find it starts slipping, you may want to consider upgrading to something else when you replace it.
My car has 27,000 miles since I picked it up new 11 years ago. Due to some misguided (though entertaining) intermittent launch habits, it is starting to slip/chatter.

So...it will take me 3-5 years to put 5000 miles on a new clutch; the car is a sunshine-only driver for me and I live in Seattle, so mid-October through April it is mostly a garage decoration. If that's a real break-in number I'll ship it back. I did notice that the DDM web side says it's a Spec clutch, but the box says RAM?

Doing just the flywheel and clutch plate would be quite a bit less expensive...
 

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However, after the 500-1000 mile break in, I bet most folks wouldn't be able to tell if my clutch is stock or not.
With the DDM clutch you can definitely tell its not stock. It will stall very quickly if you are not ready for the very fast "grab" of the clutch.

I did notice that the DDM web site says it's a Spec clutch, but the box says RAM?
The Flywheel is Spec, the clutch disc is RAM, and the pressure plate is Exedy. At least that is what I received. I assume they did this mix and match style so that the clutch actuator didn't need a spacer but I'm not actually sure.
 

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With the DDM clutch you can definitely tell its not stock. It will stall very quickly if you are not ready for the very fast "grab" of the clutch.
That's probably because I'm on the OEM flywheel but with the Spec Stage 3+ clutch. I'm sure when I go to the lighter Spec Flywheel it won't feel stock either. LOL
 
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