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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I got a question. How does the turbo's bearings keep from siezing up
from all the exhaust heat??? Immediate shut down and coking the bearings?
:confused:
5-30-2006
1st Gear
 

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That is a concern. I know in my truck (turbo diesel) I watch the exhaust gas temperature (EGT) while pulling hard and limit it to less than 1000 degrees. You would be surprised how fast the EGT move around. As soon as you unload it the EGT will drop off. The one thing I don’t do is stop at the top of the pass after pulling hard for 15 to 20 minutes. If I want to stop I wait until the EGT have cooled down. The gas turbo EGT will be higher but the same thing would hold true. The oil provides cooling for the bearing, as long as there is oil flowing the bearings are being cooled. Stop the oil and the bearings will heat up. Some turbos also use water to cool the housing. . Don’t run it hard (i.e., high EGT) and turn it off while its hot.:nono: A few minutes cool down never hurts.
 

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The bearings are oil lubricated/cooled by the engine oil. There is a pressurized oil feed line going to the center section of the turbo, and a gravity oil drain at the bottom of the turbo draining oil back into the engine. The bearings are also separated from the exhaust gas by a set of "rings". One thing that is suggested when you are about to shut down the engine is to let the engine run at idle for a few seconds before turning off the key. That allows some cooler oil to run through the turbo and not get coked up. I've over simplified it a little but that's the general idea.
 

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I am learning SOOO much on this dang forum. I bet I can pass mechanic certification in another month!!!!!
 

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There is something out there...and at present the name escapes me...that will basically pump oil to the turbine after vehicle shutdown for a specified period of time.

Most turbo cars, however, require you to idle the car for a while after driving to allow the turbo to spool down and to be sufficiantly oiled. I had a Turbo Eagle Talon '92 and in the manual it was a period of 30 seconds before shutdown. Followed it religiously and never had a turbo fail...
 

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You can get a "Turbo Timer" installed on your RedLine and you just turn the key off and get out of the vehicle and the "Turbo Timer" will keep the car at idle for a pre-set time thus letting your turbo cool off.

Here is a link!!!

I will definately look into this as my RedLine's delivery gets closer!!! :thumbs:

Regards,

:willy: BA :willy:
 

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I have a worked Evo. Years ago, you had to worry about the heat of the turbo baking the oil in the return lines after boosting, then shutting the car down immediately. That would kill your turbo real quick. With the newer synthetic oils, it is not a concern anymore at all. These oils are so resistant to heat, it's not even funny. If it's truly a concern to you, then try and take it easy the last mile of driving before parking or sit in your car for ten seconds after parking without shutting her down.
 

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intercooler? also dont pump more than 8 or 9 through the dam thing!
 
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