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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know a reputable garage that is experienced in replacing a water pump on an 08 redline ?
I live in baldwin and my zip is 11510

If you know anyone on Long Island NY that you can recommend please let me know

i may do it myself but I have to see what that entails- I’ve read some stories of issues after install

Worried
 

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It's a tedious project for sure. Most of the hassle is obstructed fasteners.

The critical things are to use the water pump sprocket tool to make sure the timing change tensioner doesn't ratchet down and to use the vacuum refill tool when putting coolant back in.Since you're saving over $1000 doing it yourself, buying that $80 tool is negligible. Last time I put coolant in the car I used the tool, then used Tim's technique to be as sure as possible all the air was out. It was the third time I've refilled coolant on a Kappa and never had an issue.

And...it's a tedious, frustrating process. With the engine out of the car it's about 20 minutes. Engine in took me about eight hours over the two hottest days ever recorded in Seattle.
 

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Nobody on Long Island knows a shop to do a water pump in a redline ??

Very discouraged :(
Have you checked with independent mechanics? The best place in this area is a small independent shop. I would look for a "GM Powertrain" sign.
 

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Be certain you're seeing the complete price. For me, after labor and taxes, all the parts, including the gaskets, fluid changes, etc., etc., etc., it ran a total of about $2,200x to get it done by a Saturn master tech at my local Chevy dealership who had problems using the water pump tool and later went back in through the crank case after the tensioner ratched, which made it sound like a super charger... I'm not convinced he was lying to me, either. He said that the tool "sometimes works, and sometimes doesn't" because of how easy it apparently is to inadvertently trigger the ratchet. Here's a guy explaining the situation:

But be it $100 or $10k, one way or another, I was getting my damn car fixed. Ha. My man got it done and she's relaxing in my garage still running like a sewing machine, so that's all that matters. :)
 

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Holy crap, for $2200 I'd almost be willing to fly somewhere and do the work. Almost :)
 

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Yeah, it sucked. I sometimes wish I would've given someone else a stab at it, but the thing is that I don't know anyone else in my area who can do the work and the guy I took it to was a Saturn Master Tech who also owns a Sky. So if I can't trust someone like that, I might as well call it a night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Be certain you're seeing the complete price. For me, after labor and taxes, all the parts, including the gaskets, fluid changes, etc., etc., etc., it ran a total of about $2,200x to get it done by a Saturn master tech at my local Chevy dealership who had problems using the water pump tool and later went back in through the crank case after the tensioner ratched, which made it sound like a super charger... I'm not convinced he was lying to me, either. He said that the tool "sometimes works, and sometimes doesn't" because of how easy it apparently is to inadvertently trigger the ratchet. Here's a guy explaining the situation:

But be it $100 or $10k, one way or another, I was getting my damn car fixed. Ha. My man got it done and she's relaxing in my garage still running like a sewing machine, so that's all that matters. :)
I wouldn’t know if I need to spend that extra money for them to adjust the timing belt until they try and run into that issue

So it was running with the tensioner too tight and it didn’t mess up the engine ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Be certain you're seeing the complete price. For me, after labor and taxes, all the parts, including the gaskets, fluid changes, etc., etc., etc., it ran a total of about $2,200x to get it done by a Saturn master tech at my local Chevy dealership who had problems using the water pump tool and later went back in through the crank case after the tensioner ratched, which made it sound like a super charger... I'm not convinced he was lying to me, either. He said that the tool "sometimes works, and sometimes doesn't" because of how easy it apparently is to inadvertently trigger the ratchet. Here's a guy explaining the situation:

But be it $100 or $10k, one way or another, I was getting my damn car fixed. Ha. My man got it done and she's relaxing in my garage still running like a sewing machine, so that's all that matters. :)
So you had to pay an additional al 500 because the tensioner ratchets down at the Chevy dealer ?
sorry to sound dumb but I just want to understand
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Didn’t seem hard to release the tension on the tensioner

seems that’s accessible when the water is beingdone anyway - doesn’t seem to need more covers to come off
 

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You really need to let me have a chance to reply to your barrage of questions...

I honestly have no idea if any of this screwed anything up, but I don't think it did from what I've seen since getting her back. From what I understand, the tensioner tightens enough to make "the sound" (the super charger sound) as it grinds into the guides and the problem is that if you don't correct it, it grinds into the guides to such an extent that it wears them down faster which can lead to larger repairs, or else (depending on how tight the ratchet tightens the chain) I've heard that it can even break the chain but only in extreme, outlier situations. Did it screw the engine up? I have no clue. Even if it did, I have a back-up engine sitting in my garage just itching to be plopped in! Ha! But I mean, maybe in a worse-case scenario it might've stretched the chain out by like a micrometer or put some teeny-tiny wear on one or all of the guides, but I doubt it because they would've only ran the engine long enough to listen for that sound and if they heard it, they would've shut it off (so there shouldn't have been any prolonged wear or tear in anything). I'll admit that I do see some teeny-tiny jumps in my RPMs in specific areas of my daily roadway commute but I was seeing that before all of this, too and I believe it's just the ECM adjusting the fuel injections to compensate roadway or environmental inconsistencies because it's not consistent except for specific locations (i.e. - uneven road like descents or ascents determine how much RPMs you need, or whenever you're driving against wind sheers, etc. you can sometimes see the RPM dial move around by like an 8th or 16th of an inch depending on the extremes in compensation that's necessary as the engine RPMs adjust to keep consistent MPH).

Beyond that, I honestly can't say anything is wrong and that it's just like how it was before being serviced. Everything sounds okay from what I can hear and I'm not seeing any codes, no weird smoke or bad smells, no odd feelings in the peddle or steering wheel or anything else. Temps in my area have been averaging 90+ (closer to 93+, actually, as July in my region is the hottest of the year) but despite that, my temp reading has consistently showed a healthy range of being between 199 - 201 on average, often dipping closer to 194 - 198, which is great and proves that my fan assembly is fine and that no problems are existent worth worrying about. Only once since getting the car back has it reached 205 and that was when I was idling in my driveway after driving her home from work on a day when it was about 101 outside and high humidity. So I'm glad I got her worked on because I'm not worried about anything.

But either way, you want to reset that tensioner if that noise ever happens so that it doesn't screw over the guides or anything else. For me, I believe we just replaced the whole damn tensioner when they did the work (I honestly don't know if that thing can be "reset" without replacing it, but either way, it was fixed and that's all I care about). I wasn't too angry about the overall cost in my situation because it gave him a chance to see what condition the chain and guides were in, and thankfully, everything was looking great!--he said the guides looked brand new with no wear marks whatsoever. He said it looked like a new set he was keeping in his toolbox for when he has to change his. Hopefully that's a good reflection on my care as I rarely drive her up to 55 MPH and she's garage-kept, rarely being taken out even in rain. I love this car and plan on being laid to rest with her. Ha.

As for the "additional 500," not sure, man. I know they go by specific book prices--at least, that's what I've heard--but I had a couple other things done for this including a replacement belt that had a few cracks in it, so I'm sure there's a little wiggle room in my final cost that came from things that were entirely from the water pump change, but whatever. She's fixed and running fine.

Be leery of people on here who blow hard about having some best friend of a cousin who changed theirs for only $1,000, etc. You'll see a few on here with wonderful wet dream experiences and while I'm sure some have access to great mechanics who can pull some favors or do things at great costs, it's a far-cry from the average experience. In fact, you'll find that the more you dive into these things, the more often you'll see prices gradually increase in time as qualified people who know how to do these things are becoming rarer and rarer. So while my $2,200x cost might seem like a lot, it's a minor expense when considering that the car is working fine again and done by someone who knew how to do it correctly despite being unable to get that tool to work like we all want it to. Sooner than later, these kinds of mechanics will be harder and harder to find in time, so I honestly don't mind paying a little more than some if it means keeping my car running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you and sorry for all the questions I just type as I think of them

i was just thinking maybe the difference between the 1600 I was quoted from The Chevy dealer and the 2200 You paid may have been because they had to reset the tensioner
 

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Thank you and sorry for all the questions I just type as I think of them

i was just thinking maybe the difference between the 1600 I was quoted from The Chevy dealer and the 2200 You paid may have been because they had to reset the tensioner
No worries. But despite hating the amount I had to pay for all this, I'm happy I had it done. Whether I got screwed or just paid a more honest price that more dealerships always want to charge, I just know that it's not as easy a job as some try to make it sound, especially if you're a diligent mechanic who knows where things can be overlooked or taken for granted. Some of the seasoned guys might try to make it sound like you can do it at home, but there's no way someone should if they haven't been trained for it. And I say that for a billion reasons that go way beyond whether the water pump tool is being used properly. If paying a little more translates to avoiding major problems, then it's worth it in my eyes, especially for a vehicle that isn't being produced anymore that depends on mechanics who know how to service these cars using parts that are becoming more and more scarce. Sure, it's not always the rule-of-thumb and sometimes you can get lucky by finding a cheaper approach, but what often gets overlooked in these situations is the jeopardy that can also come with those lower costs. At which point, the old adage about getting what you pay for comes into play and that's not something you want to deal with.

As for your situation, that price range sounds okay to me. I wouldn't worry too much about it, but if you can, try to record the sound of the engine before having the work done as I've read stories about unqualified mechanics or shops trying to contest the "super charger" noise that's heard by the customer after the work is done. If you have a recorded sound before getting it changed, and it then makes the sound after, your mechanic / shop will be dead-to-rights if you show them / let them listen to how the engine sounded beforehand. From there, they should know what needs done to fix the problem: resetting the tensioner. You might be dinged a bit more, as again, that water pump tool isn't as fail-safe as some try to make it sound, but at least you'll know what's causing it and can get them to fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Just dropped car in dealer lot and dropped key off at key drop
drove the car there - about 20 minutes- didn't overheat
205 top temp
i stated on the key envelope that the car does not over heat but it leaks coolant from the water pump and needs the water pump replaced - I also wrote to please use stand-off pucks while jacking and that the plastic front fenders will crack
We'll see what call i get this week - I know dealers so even though my apppointment is tomorow I'm not planning for hearing from them until Thursday
 
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