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I'm three weeks into Sky ownership and seem to have some catching up to do. What a great thread!

Done so far,
1. Every fluid except transmission (auto) has been changed.

2. Front and rear cameras installed, monitored by a small temporary screen (new head unit will eventually replace that)

3. Mood lighting (blue) added under dash

4. Auxiliary gauge lighting installed (I can see the gas gauge now)

5. Added a brightness control for 3 and 4.

6. Changed out most incandescent bulbs for LEDs including the mirror and backup light.

7. Created brackets to hold four resistors needed for tail light LEDs away from body work.

8. Switchback LEDs replaced the turn signal bulbs.

9. Swapped amber side marker lighting for smoke.

Future plans include a Trifecta tune and new head unit.

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Woo Hoo!

Cobb LED strip is attached to the underside of the metal strip across the top (front?) of the trunk lid. I removed the latch and half of the liner (the plugs just pop out) to run a wire down to the bellows type tunnel then over to wiring for the stock trunk light. Soldered the new connection then opened a door. It works!
Automotive tire Hood Automotive lighting Trunk Motor vehicle

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gadgetjq, So you decided to add across the entire top of the trunk lid. I did a small center section of 15 LEDs for fear that so many would be hard on my battery. Yours looks a lot better than mine.
View attachment 120354
View attachment 120355
Thanks for the compliment. I'm not worried about the power draw since the trunk light shuts off automatically after 10 (or so) minutes. If I can't find something in this trunk in that amount of time something's real wrong. :D
 

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This is one of those 'many have tried, some have given up' mods if some of the posts about replacing fog lights with LEDs are any indication. Some (most?) replacements are either longer or fatter than the OEM bulb and just can't be dropped in easily like most bulb replacements. This might be especially problematic with the Redline due to the brake cooling duct. So, here's the path around that little problem.

Loosen the housing for your turn/fog lights by removing two screws at the top (super simple) and one at the bottom (not so much). Lift and turn the housing enough so you can slide your new bulb in, connect the plug and test before putting everything back.

Now, about that bottom screw. If you have smaller hands and a really stubby Phillips type screwdriver you 'might' be able to get it on the screw. You have to come at it from underneath. If that doesn't work out, remove three of the press plugs holding the front splash panel to the bumper and one small screw in the wheel well. Let the panel drop and you'll be able to get a screwdriver on that frustrating fastener from under the car. For some reason the driver's side on my car was harder to work with in every respect than the passenger side.

Here's a link to the H-11 fog bulb recommended by others who've used it in Sky groups and on the Sky forum: https://ebay.to/3Ppc5eW
Cheers!
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Automotive parking light Grille White Hood Light
 

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I created a console divider. I used scrap lying around but you can make this for less than $15 using new products from the Dollar Store and Home Depot. This might take an hour, not counting waiting for paint to dry.

First off, I have only the most basic of woodworking tools and meager woodworking skills so pretty much anyone can do this.

You start with an old file folder or construction paper. Cut it to fit along one of the rear storage compartment sidewalls (the other side is a mirror image so you only need a single pattern).
Rectangle Wood Paint Material property Wood stain

An easy way to form the pattern is to use a fingernail or the back (dull) side of a kitchen knife to force the paper around turns. With your basic pattern created, cut it out and test fit. Note in my photos I had to add a second layer (blue tape) to make the fit correct.


Form a shelf by creating a pattern of the bottom of the cubby but make it slightly oversize. The opening flares out as you move upward so you'll be trimming the sides later.

When you're happy with your patterns you can transfer them to another medium. I chose to use foam board ($1 at the dollar store) before moving on to MDF (1/4 x 2' x 4' is $13 at Home Depot if you don't have any scrap lying around). Test fit your foam sides and this time fit/shape your paper shelf.
Rectangle Wood Art Font Flooring

Note the space also tapers front to rear. Be careful where you place the shelf, the latch takes up a lot of space.

Transfer the shape to your foam board and test fit again.
Gas Fixture Machine Major appliance Motor vehicle

If anything isn't right it's easy to trim or add material now. Once you're happy with the fit, transfer your foam patterns to MDF.

Decide where you want the shelf (again, watch out for the latch) and mark the sides for shelf supports. Create the supports from MDF scrap and glue them to your sides. Carefully check your measurement from the bottom of each side panel to the top of each shelf support so your shelf will be level.
Wood Rectangle Beige Flooring Hardwood

When the glue dries, test fit again. If it's all good, paint your new divider whatever color you want.
Gas Machine Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive exterior


You now have an option. You can glue the shelf to the supports or just leave it free floating so it's easily removed if you have to stick something larger than a Whopper in there.
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Cheers!
 

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Installed a Garage Door Opener

This little mod was inspired by someone asking where everyone keeps their garage door openers. Here's my solution.
Car Motor vehicle Automotive design Steering part Personal luxury car


And here's how you do it.

1. Unearth that spare garage remote that's been languishing in your junk drawer for years or, get a new one that matches your system. Mine happens to be a Genie so I found an opener that'll work for about $12 on Amazon. https://amzn.to/3Q0U9Ys

2. You'll need a momentary push button. This is the one in the photos: https://amzn.to/3QVATN0

3. Tools: A soldering iron (flux, solder etc), wire cutter/stripper.

4. Identify where you'll want to place your opener button and round up enough wire (20 or 22 gauge should work fine) to reach between the button location and the spot you'll stash the actual remote. I placed mine under the center (console?) where there's plenty of open space. That panel removes easily by pulling straight up at the rear then do the same at the front. If your remote is especially thick this location might not work for you. Also keep in mind the range of these little remotes isn't great so the more open the better (your windshield header would probably be optimal).

Here we go.

1. After programming the remote to your opener and making sure you're starting with a fresh battery, open it up so you have access to the circuit board. Identify the contacts or switch activated by pressing the button on the remote. Identify two sides of that contact/switch by touching a piece of wire or paper clip to both sides. If your garage opener works you're golden. If not, try two more contacts etc until you find the magic.

2. Solder your switch to the two contacts:
Gadget Font Cable Electronic device Wire


3. Test by pressing your new button. If the garage door opens move to the next step. If not, check your solder joints.

4. Place the circuit board back in the remote case and identify where the cable will come out. You'll have to file or cut a relief in the case so it'll close.
Material property Gadget Communication Device Wood Composite material


Put a piece of tape over the contacts you soldered to prevent the old button on the remote from activating the door. Close the case and test your new button again. If it's still working, apply a little bit of silicone glue or other adhesive to the point where the cable exits to provide a bit of strain relief. You're done with this part. Let's install it.

5. Earlier you identified where you want to put your button and the remote. Go ahead and place them now.
Motor vehicle Automotive design Car Automotive exterior Personal luxury car

Note, double sided tape really doesn't like to stick to the black pebbled portions of our interiors. I used a tiny dot of silicone glue. Tape the button in place for awhile so the glue (or double sided tape if you want to give it a shot) can adhere completely. A little bit of double sided tape on the back of the remote will keep in place almost anywhere (except the....you know)
Motor vehicle Automotive design Car Auto part Automotive exterior


Replace your cover (or tidy up wherever you placed the remote/button) and you're done. Now test the range. You may or may not be disappointed depending on the remote you used. Mine would open the garage door from across the street before installation in the car, now it works when I'm in the driveway. Good enough.

Cheers! :D
 

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I exorcised a rattle. It was a rattle I couldn't really hear with the top down but with the cabin closed up there was a maddening buzz over anything but the smoothest pavement. I finally had my son go for a ride with me and he found it. The rattle was the right side map light lens on the bottom of the mirror. During our ride he slapped a sticky note (another undocumented use for the things) on it and shazam, no more buzz.

So, the fix. I removed both lenses and, using a toothpick, applied some little dots of clear silicone glue around the interior edge (where it's not frosted) of the lens. After the glue dried I popped the lenses back into the mirror and both are now tight (but not glued in). Bye bye buzz.
Cheers!
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Added lighting under the hood.

This is a project that's been detailed in this forum before so there's no need for a step-by-step except I changed up a couple of things. Rather than using the accessory port (lighter) fuse I used one of the spare slots in the under hood fuse box with an add-a-fuse. I've added a switch to the usual pin switch so the lighting can be turned off when they're not needed and the hood is open.

Items used for this project:

1. 4000k Cobb LED strip: https://amzn.to/3Rtf9rW
2. 22 Gauge Wire: https://amzn.to/3AVY1Es
3. Wire Loom: 1/4 in. x 14 ft. Protective Wire Wrap
4. Pin Switch: https://amzn.to/3BaO06C
5. Random on/off push button switch
6. Quick Disconnects (switches and front of hood): https://amzn.to/3Qrmwz2

 

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Tinted the tops of my headlight enclosures. Looks good and there's no light lost on the road.
This is the first time I've used film cutting tape. It really helped with the curve around the outside of the lens and saves any chance of scratching the lens with a blade.


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Car Vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Grille


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I added a remote start and it's pretty awesome! Before anyone asks, this module is for automatic trans only. The install could hardly be easier. Remove three screws from the bottom of the steering column, plug in a harness, marry the module to your car (a multi step process involving the key) and you're done if all you want is remote start. There's some fancy stuff too including turning your head and tail lights on when the engine starts. That's a little more work and not required. Here's a video.

Cheers!
 
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