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Installed Norm’s rear diffuser today along with the Opel rear lamp.

If it helps any, I came across several postings that stated that the 2009 factory rear valence was different. Mine is an ‘09, built in August of 2008. There was no difference in the mounting-one metal clip on the lower on each side and the Christmas tree fasteners across the bottom.
Kind of balked at first thinking maybe there was a change as this one seemed to come off much harder than the one on my 08-the clips seemed a lot more difficult to disengage.

Wired the lamp in as backup and brake light for now. Still have all the other factory pieces but that’s going to take more thought and effort than I want to spend right now.
Good one for a Michigan winter.

And of course, the ruby red was a perfect match.
 

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I created a console divider. I used scrap lying around but you can make this for less than $15 using new products from the Dollar Store and Home Depot. This might take an hour, not counting waiting for paint to dry.

First off, I have only the most basic of woodworking tools and meager woodworking skills so pretty much anyone can do this.

You start with an old file folder or construction paper. Cut it to fit along one of the rear storage compartment sidewalls (the other side is a mirror image so you only need a single pattern). View attachment 120465
An easy way to form the pattern is to use a fingernail or the back (dull) side of a kitchen knife to force the paper around turns. With your basic pattern created, cut it out and test fit. Note in my photos I had to add a second layer (blue tape) to make the fit correct.


Form a shelf by creating a pattern of the bottom of the cubby but make it slightly oversize. The opening flares out as you move upward so you'll be trimming the sides later.

When you're happy with your patterns you can transfer them to another medium. I chose to use foam board ($1 at the dollar store) before moving on to MDF (1/4 x 2' x 4' is $13 at Home Depot if you don't have any scrap lying around). Test fit your foam sides and this time fit/shape your paper shelf. View attachment 120466
Note the space also tapers front to rear. Be careful where you place the shelf, the latch takes up a lot of space.

Transfer the shape to your foam board and test fit again. View attachment 120467
If anything isn't right it's easy to trim or add material now. Once you're happy with the fit, transfer your foam patterns to MDF.

Decide where you want the shelf (again, watch out for the latch) and mark the sides for shelf supports. Create the supports from MDF scrap and glue them to your sides. Carefully check your measurement from the bottom of each side panel to the top of each shelf support so your shelf will be level. View attachment 120468
When the glue dries, test fit again. If it's all good, paint your new divider whatever color you want. View attachment 120469

You now have an option. You can glue the shelf to the supports or just leave it free floating so it's easily removed if you have to stick something larger than a Whopper in there. View attachment 120470

Cheers!
You doubled your storage!
 

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Installed Norm’s rear diffuser today along with the Opel rear lamp.

If it helps any, I came across several postings that stated that the 2009 factory rear valence was different. Mine is an ‘09, built in August of 2008. There was no difference in the mounting-one metal clip on the lower on each side and the Christmas tree fasteners across the bottom.
Kind of balked at first thinking maybe there was a change as this one seemed to come off much harder than the one on my 08-the clips seemed a lot more difficult to disengage.

Wired the lamp in as backup and brake light for now. Still have all the other factory pieces but that’s going to take more thought and effort than I want to spend right now.
Good one for a Michigan winter.

And of course, the ruby red was a perfect match.
On things that are that good looking, we need pictures!
 

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Installed a Garage Door Opener

This little mod was inspired by someone asking where everyone keeps their garage door openers. Here's my solution.
Car Motor vehicle Automotive design Steering part Personal luxury car


And here's how you do it.

1. Unearth that spare garage remote that's been languishing in your junk drawer for years or, get a new one that matches your system. Mine happens to be a Genie so I found an opener that'll work for about $12 on Amazon. https://amzn.to/3Q0U9Ys

2. You'll need a momentary push button. This is the one in the photos: https://amzn.to/3QVATN0

3. Tools: A soldering iron (flux, solder etc), wire cutter/stripper.

4. Identify where you'll want to place your opener button and round up enough wire (20 or 22 gauge should work fine) to reach between the button location and the spot you'll stash the actual remote. I placed mine under the center (console?) where there's plenty of open space. That panel removes easily by pulling straight up at the rear then do the same at the front. If your remote is especially thick this location might not work for you. Also keep in mind the range of these little remotes isn't great so the more open the better (your windshield header would probably be optimal).

Here we go.

1. After programming the remote to your opener and making sure you're starting with a fresh battery, open it up so you have access to the circuit board. Identify the contacts or switch activated by pressing the button on the remote. Identify two sides of that contact/switch by touching a piece of wire or paper clip to both sides. If your garage opener works you're golden. If not, try two more contacts etc until you find the magic.

2. Solder your switch to the two contacts:
Gadget Font Cable Electronic device Wire


3. Test by pressing your new button. If the garage door opens move to the next step. If not, check your solder joints.

4. Place the circuit board back in the remote case and identify where the cable will come out. You'll have to file or cut a relief in the case so it'll close.
Material property Gadget Communication Device Wood Composite material


Put a piece of tape over the contacts you soldered to prevent the old button on the remote from activating the door. Close the case and test your new button again. If it's still working, apply a little bit of silicone glue or other adhesive to the point where the cable exits to provide a bit of strain relief. You're done with this part. Let's install it.

5. Earlier you identified where you want to put your button and the remote. Go ahead and place them now.
Motor vehicle Automotive design Car Automotive exterior Personal luxury car

Note, double sided tape really doesn't like to stick to the black pebbled portions of our interiors. I used a tiny dot of silicone glue. Tape the button in place for awhile so the glue (or double sided tape if you want to give it a shot) can adhere completely. A little bit of double sided tape on the back of the remote will keep in place almost anywhere (except the....you know)
Motor vehicle Automotive design Car Auto part Automotive exterior


Replace your cover (or tidy up wherever you placed the remote/button) and you're done. Now test the range. You may or may not be disappointed depending on the remote you used. Mine would open the garage door from across the street before installation in the car, now it works when I'm in the driveway. Good enough.

Cheers! :D
 

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Very nicely done!
I took the lazy route and velcroed mine to a spot on the inside of the glovebox door that didn’t interfere with opening and closing it.
Now I have less storage space than ever….
 

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I exorcised a rattle. It was a rattle I couldn't really hear with the top down but with the cabin closed up there was a maddening buzz over anything but the smoothest pavement. I finally had my son go for a ride with me and he found it. The rattle was the right side map light lens on the bottom of the mirror. During our ride he slapped a sticky note (another undocumented use for the things) on it and shazam, no more buzz.

So, the fix. I removed both lenses and, using a toothpick, applied some little dots of clear silicone glue around the interior edge (where it's not frosted) of the lens. After the glue dried I popped the lenses back into the mirror and both are now tight (but not glued in). Bye bye buzz.
Cheers!
Hood Automotive lighting Vehicle Automotive mirror Motor vehicle
 

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Added lighting under the hood.

This is a project that's been detailed in this forum before so there's no need for a step-by-step except I changed up a couple of things. Rather than using the accessory port (lighter) fuse I used one of the spare slots in the under hood fuse box with an add-a-fuse. I've added a switch to the usual pin switch so the lighting can be turned off when they're not needed and the hood is open.

Items used for this project:

1. 4000k Cobb LED strip: https://amzn.to/3Rtf9rW
2. 22 Gauge Wire: https://amzn.to/3AVY1Es
3. Wire Loom: 1/4 in. x 14 ft. Protective Wire Wrap
4. Pin Switch: https://amzn.to/3BaO06C
5. Random on/off push button switch
6. Quick Disconnects (switches and front of hood): https://amzn.to/3Qrmwz2

 
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