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Rubber parts are always an issue unless they are still manufacturing replacements. Rubber can go bad even sitting on a shelf in the dark in a warehouse. It ages/de-gasses from day one. Exposure to UV speeds up the process a lot though. When buying new rubber parts, start protecting it ASAP with conditioners because although new to you, it may have already sat on a shelf somewhere for years. So I would still be cautious of stockpiling rubber parts.

Personally I have had good luck restoring rubber parts using wintergreen oil with great results. I've never done any weather stripping, but for carb boots, air intakes, etc. Wintergreen oil is the only thing I have ever found that actually works.
 

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Rubber parts are always an issue unless they are still manufacturing replacements. Rubber can go bad even sitting on a shelf in the dark in a warehouse. It ages/de-gasses from day one. Exposure to UV speeds up the process a lot though. When buying new rubber parts, start protecting it ASAP with conditioners because although new to you, it may have already sat on a shelf somewhere for years. So I would still be cautious of stockpiling rubber parts.

Personally I have had good luck restoring rubber parts using wintergreen oil with great results. I've never done any weather stripping, but for carb boots, air intakes, etc. Wintergreen oil is the only thing I have ever found that actually works.
Good point. I'm sure these parts are old and have been sitting in the michigan warehouse for years. I'll see how they look and decide if I want to use them or not. The ones on I have are almost flat so there's no restoring them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Good point. I'm sure these parts are old and have been sitting in the michigan warehouse for years. I'll see how they look and decide if I want to use them or not. The ones on I have are almost flat so there's no restoring them.
Everything I have received from them is as new so hopefully you’ll be fine.
 

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Good point. I'm sure these parts are old and have been sitting in the michigan warehouse for years. I'll see how they look and decide if I want to use them or not. The ones on I have are almost flat so there's no restoring them.
They very well could be a decade old, but since they have been stored out of the elements they should be in better condition then what you have currently, just don't expect showroom new condition.

If you're interested in an experiment for the group, try using the wintergreen oil method on your old set after you pull since you're going to trash them anyway. It may not make them like new, but they should soften up and bit and be more pliable. I had a set of carb boots on a 25 year old bike that had become basically plastic they were so rigid. I couldn't even separate the carbs unless I rigged up some ratchet strap pulley monstrosity. I soaked them in wintergreen oil/rubbing alcohol for a few days, and although not like "new", they were much softer and I could actually pop the carbs back in with just my hands.
 

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Personally I have had good luck restoring rubber parts using wintergreen oil with great results. I've never done any weather stripping, but for carb boots, air intakes, etc. Wintergreen oil is the only thing I have ever found that actually works.
Would it be possible to print new rubberlike parts out of TPA plastic after some trial and error?
 

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Would it be possible to print new rubberlike parts out of TPA plastic after some trial and error?
I've only dabbled in 3D printing, but I imagine as the technology is improving it would be possible, but is TPA malleable enough to be used in a weather stripping scenario? I could see a small intake hoses or something like that, but weather stripping needs to be thin and able to be fully compressed and then return to it's original shape like memory foam.
 

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Would it be possible to print new rubberlike parts out of TPA plastic after some trial and error?
While nearly everything is "possible", weatherstrips are currently far from practicable. The shapes are complex, the parts are fairly large and, as @steveorama said, the materials are not the most suitable.
 

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I've only dabbled in 3D printing, but I imagine as the technology is improving it would be possible, but is TPA malleable enough to be used in a weather stripping scenario? I could see a small intake hoses or something like that, but weather stripping needs to be thin and able to be fully compressed and then return to it's original shape like memory foam.
I'm actually not quite sure about the specifics of TPA other than it's rubber like. I've never printed with the material. I'll need to look into it.

Edit: TPU not TPA, I'm dumb
 

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eBay has a original fly scatter with mounting hardware
 
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You should look into adjusting the windows to get a good seal.
Rob makes a good point.

I bought our Sky with both doors window glass needing adjusting. There was indication they were previously removed by a prior owner to install a tint-film because the product was adhered well below the beltline. I bought the car with the tint-film rippled so I removed the door glass a second time to clean off 100% of the film.

My early 2007's original convertible top with the early plan-A design, was tired with splitting seams, and the gasket around the windshield was torn. I replaced everything with a perfect condition plan-B design.

Disturbing both the glass and the convertible top required significant alignment effort. Do NOT take alignment lightly because if not adjusted "just right", water will leak inside and air will whistle at highway speeds.

What you think is a bad gasket, might be misaligned door glass. I've been there.
 

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You should look into adjusting the windows to get a good seal. The window is highlighted adjustable. The side deals can be found but installing them is a bitch. Take care of them
Oh there perfectly adjusted. They were doublechecked when I had the regulator/motors replaced. There are two seals that meet right in the middle of the window. That area is completely flat, and there is a minor leak whenever the top gets wet. The top is not leaking (thankfully), but drops in between the seams of the seals go inside the glass.
 

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Rubber parts are always an issue unless they are still manufacturing replacements. Rubber can go bad even sitting on a shelf in the dark in a warehouse. It ages/de-gasses from day one. Exposure to UV speeds up the process a lot though. When buying new rubber parts, start protecting it ASAP with conditioners because although new to you, it may have already sat on a shelf somewhere for years. So I would still be cautious of stockpiling rubber parts.

Personally I have had good luck restoring rubber parts using wintergreen oil with great results. I've never done any weather stripping, but for carb boots, air intakes, etc. Wintergreen oil is the only thing I have ever found that actually works.
Regarding rubber protection, thought I'd share something that not only cleans, but really has improved the quality of my seals. Try Meguire's Marine/RV 57 Vinyl & Rubber cleaner protectant. I apply and re-apply 3x, letting it soak in. Incredible!
 

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Regarding rubber protection, thought I'd share something that not only cleans, but really has improved the quality of my seals. Try Meguire's Marine/RV 57 Vinyl & Rubber cleaner protectant. I apply and re-apply 3x, letting it soak in. Incredible!
Ive had very good luck with my saab 9-3 convertible using shin-etsu silicone grease which is the oem acura/honda brand. Stuff is really good, not greasy at all and doesnt attract dirt. I expect to have it tomorrow and give all seals a thorough work with it over the weekend
 

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Regarding rubber protection, thought I'd share something that not only cleans, but really has improved the quality of my seals. Try Meguire's Marine/RV 57 Vinyl & Rubber cleaner protectant. I apply and re-apply 3x, letting it soak in. Incredible!
I was primarily referring to restoring as opposed to protecting. It's one thing to maintain rubber parts with conditioners etc continually over time. It's another thing to take a 20 year old piece of rubber that's never been treated a day in it's life and rub some conditioner on it. It simply doesn't work. The wintergreen oil with rubbing alcohol bath is to this day the only thing I have ever found that actually restores old hard rubber parts. It smells nice when you are done too as a bonus!
 

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I was primarily referring to restoring as opposed to protecting. It's one thing to maintain rubber parts with conditioners etc continually over time. It's another thing to take a 20 year old piece of rubber that's never been treated a day in it's life and rub some conditioner on it. It simply doesn't work. The wintergreen oil with rubbing alcohol bath is to this day the only thing I have ever found that actually restores old hard rubber parts. It smells nice when you are done too as a bonus!
Whats the mix ratio of oil to alcohol, and what proof do you use?
 
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